Epidemiology of human papilloma virus (HPV) in cervical mucosa

Subhash Chauhan, Meena Jaggi, Maria C. Bell, Mukesh Verma, Deepak Kumar

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In a worldwide scenario, human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is the second leading cause of cancer-related morbidity and mortality among women due to its very close association with cervical cancer. More than 100 different types of HPV genotypes have been characterized to date. Among these, approximately 24 HPV genotypes specifically infect the genital and oral mucosal system. The mucosal HPVs are most frequently sexually transmitted, and they are responsible for the most common sexually transmitted diseases throughout the world. In a majority of the cases, oncogenic/nononcogenic HPV infections spontaneously clear by themselves without any medical intervention. However, a persistent and long-term HPV infection usually leads to cervical cancer, which remains difficult to treat. In recent years, advance understanding of the structure of HPV and its pathogenesis has led to a variety of new treatments to combat HPV-related diseases, including a Food and Drug Administration-approved HPV vaccine that is very effective in young women. To effectively use this HPV vaccine worldwide, a clear understanding of HPV genotypes in different geographical populations is imperative. In this chapter, we have focused briefly on HPV genotypes and HPV prevalence in the women of different geographical populations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationCancer Epidemiology
Subtitle of host publicationVolume I: Host Susceptibility Factors
EditorsMukesh Verma
Pages439-456
Number of pages18
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 23 2009
Externally publishedYes

Publication series

NameMethods in Molecular Biology
Volume471
ISSN (Print)1064-3745

Fingerprint

Papillomaviridae
Mucous Membrane
Epidemiology
Virus Diseases
Genotype
Papillomavirus Vaccines
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms
Papillomavirus Infections
United States Food and Drug Administration
Sexually Transmitted Diseases
Population

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Molecular Biology
  • Genetics

Cite this

Chauhan, S., Jaggi, M., Bell, M. C., Verma, M., & Kumar, D. (2009). Epidemiology of human papilloma virus (HPV) in cervical mucosa. In M. Verma (Ed.), Cancer Epidemiology: Volume I: Host Susceptibility Factors (pp. 439-456). (Methods in Molecular Biology; Vol. 471). https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-59745-416-2_22

Epidemiology of human papilloma virus (HPV) in cervical mucosa. / Chauhan, Subhash; Jaggi, Meena; Bell, Maria C.; Verma, Mukesh; Kumar, Deepak.

Cancer Epidemiology: Volume I: Host Susceptibility Factors. ed. / Mukesh Verma. 2009. p. 439-456 (Methods in Molecular Biology; Vol. 471).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Chauhan, S, Jaggi, M, Bell, MC, Verma, M & Kumar, D 2009, Epidemiology of human papilloma virus (HPV) in cervical mucosa. in M Verma (ed.), Cancer Epidemiology: Volume I: Host Susceptibility Factors. Methods in Molecular Biology, vol. 471, pp. 439-456. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-59745-416-2_22
Chauhan S, Jaggi M, Bell MC, Verma M, Kumar D. Epidemiology of human papilloma virus (HPV) in cervical mucosa. In Verma M, editor, Cancer Epidemiology: Volume I: Host Susceptibility Factors. 2009. p. 439-456. (Methods in Molecular Biology). https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-59745-416-2_22
Chauhan, Subhash ; Jaggi, Meena ; Bell, Maria C. ; Verma, Mukesh ; Kumar, Deepak. / Epidemiology of human papilloma virus (HPV) in cervical mucosa. Cancer Epidemiology: Volume I: Host Susceptibility Factors. editor / Mukesh Verma. 2009. pp. 439-456 (Methods in Molecular Biology).
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