Epigallocatechin-3-gallate improves plantaris muscle recovery after disuse in aged rats

Stephen Alway, Brian T. Bennett, Joseph C. Wilson, Neile K. Edens, Suzette L. Pereira

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

24 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Aging exacerbates muscle loss and slows the recovery of muscle mass and function after disuse. In this study we investigated the potential that epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCg), an abundant catechin in green tea, would reduce signaling for apoptosis and promote skeletal muscle recovery in the fast plantaris muscle and the slow soleus muscle after hindlimb suspension (HLS) in senescent animals. Fischer 344×Brown Norway inbred rats (age 34months) received either EGCg (50mg/kg body weight), or water daily by gavage. One group of animals received HLS for 14days and a second group of rats received 14days of HLS, then the HLS was removed and they recovered from this forced disuse for 2weeks. Animals that received EGCg over the HLS followed by 14days of recovery, had a 14% greater plantaris muscle weight (p<0.05) as compared to the animals treated with the vehicle over this same period. Plantaris fiber area was greater after recovery in EGCg (2715.2±113.8μm2) vs. vehicle treated animals (1953.0±41.9μm2). In addition, activation of myogenic progenitor cells was improved with EGCg over vehicle treatment (7.5% vs. 6.2%) in the recovery animals. Compared to vehicle treatment, the apoptotic index was lower (0.24% vs. 0.52%), and the abundance of pro-apoptotic proteins Bax (-22%), and FADD (-77%) was lower in EGCg treated plantaris muscles after recovery. While EGCg did not prevent unloading-induced atrophy, it improved muscle recovery after the atrophic stimulus in fast plantaris muscles. However, this effect was muscle specific because EGCg had no major impact in reversing HLS-induced atrophy in the slow soleus muscle of old rats.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)82-94
Number of pages13
JournalExperimental Gerontology
Volume50
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2014
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Hindlimb Suspension
Muscle
Rats
Skeletal Muscle
Recovery
Suspensions
Animals
Muscles
Atrophy
Apoptosis Regulatory Proteins
epigallocatechin gallate
Catechin
Body Water
Tea
Stem Cells
Body Weight
Unloading
Apoptosis
Weights and Measures
Aging of materials

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Biochemistry
  • Aging
  • Molecular Biology
  • Genetics
  • Endocrinology
  • Cell Biology

Cite this

Epigallocatechin-3-gallate improves plantaris muscle recovery after disuse in aged rats. / Alway, Stephen; Bennett, Brian T.; Wilson, Joseph C.; Edens, Neile K.; Pereira, Suzette L.

In: Experimental Gerontology, Vol. 50, No. 1, 01.02.2014, p. 82-94.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Alway, Stephen ; Bennett, Brian T. ; Wilson, Joseph C. ; Edens, Neile K. ; Pereira, Suzette L. / Epigallocatechin-3-gallate improves plantaris muscle recovery after disuse in aged rats. In: Experimental Gerontology. 2014 ; Vol. 50, No. 1. pp. 82-94.
@article{6fb616ec7ef546ba97f97b1873667cda,
title = "Epigallocatechin-3-gallate improves plantaris muscle recovery after disuse in aged rats",
abstract = "Aging exacerbates muscle loss and slows the recovery of muscle mass and function after disuse. In this study we investigated the potential that epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCg), an abundant catechin in green tea, would reduce signaling for apoptosis and promote skeletal muscle recovery in the fast plantaris muscle and the slow soleus muscle after hindlimb suspension (HLS) in senescent animals. Fischer 344×Brown Norway inbred rats (age 34months) received either EGCg (50mg/kg body weight), or water daily by gavage. One group of animals received HLS for 14days and a second group of rats received 14days of HLS, then the HLS was removed and they recovered from this forced disuse for 2weeks. Animals that received EGCg over the HLS followed by 14days of recovery, had a 14{\%} greater plantaris muscle weight (p<0.05) as compared to the animals treated with the vehicle over this same period. Plantaris fiber area was greater after recovery in EGCg (2715.2±113.8μm2) vs. vehicle treated animals (1953.0±41.9μm2). In addition, activation of myogenic progenitor cells was improved with EGCg over vehicle treatment (7.5{\%} vs. 6.2{\%}) in the recovery animals. Compared to vehicle treatment, the apoptotic index was lower (0.24{\%} vs. 0.52{\%}), and the abundance of pro-apoptotic proteins Bax (-22{\%}), and FADD (-77{\%}) was lower in EGCg treated plantaris muscles after recovery. While EGCg did not prevent unloading-induced atrophy, it improved muscle recovery after the atrophic stimulus in fast plantaris muscles. However, this effect was muscle specific because EGCg had no major impact in reversing HLS-induced atrophy in the slow soleus muscle of old rats.",
author = "Stephen Alway and Bennett, {Brian T.} and Wilson, {Joseph C.} and Edens, {Neile K.} and Pereira, {Suzette L.}",
year = "2014",
month = "2",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.exger.2013.11.011",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "50",
pages = "82--94",
journal = "Experimental Gerontology",
issn = "0531-5565",
publisher = "Elsevier Inc.",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Epigallocatechin-3-gallate improves plantaris muscle recovery after disuse in aged rats

AU - Alway, Stephen

AU - Bennett, Brian T.

AU - Wilson, Joseph C.

AU - Edens, Neile K.

AU - Pereira, Suzette L.

PY - 2014/2/1

Y1 - 2014/2/1

N2 - Aging exacerbates muscle loss and slows the recovery of muscle mass and function after disuse. In this study we investigated the potential that epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCg), an abundant catechin in green tea, would reduce signaling for apoptosis and promote skeletal muscle recovery in the fast plantaris muscle and the slow soleus muscle after hindlimb suspension (HLS) in senescent animals. Fischer 344×Brown Norway inbred rats (age 34months) received either EGCg (50mg/kg body weight), or water daily by gavage. One group of animals received HLS for 14days and a second group of rats received 14days of HLS, then the HLS was removed and they recovered from this forced disuse for 2weeks. Animals that received EGCg over the HLS followed by 14days of recovery, had a 14% greater plantaris muscle weight (p<0.05) as compared to the animals treated with the vehicle over this same period. Plantaris fiber area was greater after recovery in EGCg (2715.2±113.8μm2) vs. vehicle treated animals (1953.0±41.9μm2). In addition, activation of myogenic progenitor cells was improved with EGCg over vehicle treatment (7.5% vs. 6.2%) in the recovery animals. Compared to vehicle treatment, the apoptotic index was lower (0.24% vs. 0.52%), and the abundance of pro-apoptotic proteins Bax (-22%), and FADD (-77%) was lower in EGCg treated plantaris muscles after recovery. While EGCg did not prevent unloading-induced atrophy, it improved muscle recovery after the atrophic stimulus in fast plantaris muscles. However, this effect was muscle specific because EGCg had no major impact in reversing HLS-induced atrophy in the slow soleus muscle of old rats.

AB - Aging exacerbates muscle loss and slows the recovery of muscle mass and function after disuse. In this study we investigated the potential that epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCg), an abundant catechin in green tea, would reduce signaling for apoptosis and promote skeletal muscle recovery in the fast plantaris muscle and the slow soleus muscle after hindlimb suspension (HLS) in senescent animals. Fischer 344×Brown Norway inbred rats (age 34months) received either EGCg (50mg/kg body weight), or water daily by gavage. One group of animals received HLS for 14days and a second group of rats received 14days of HLS, then the HLS was removed and they recovered from this forced disuse for 2weeks. Animals that received EGCg over the HLS followed by 14days of recovery, had a 14% greater plantaris muscle weight (p<0.05) as compared to the animals treated with the vehicle over this same period. Plantaris fiber area was greater after recovery in EGCg (2715.2±113.8μm2) vs. vehicle treated animals (1953.0±41.9μm2). In addition, activation of myogenic progenitor cells was improved with EGCg over vehicle treatment (7.5% vs. 6.2%) in the recovery animals. Compared to vehicle treatment, the apoptotic index was lower (0.24% vs. 0.52%), and the abundance of pro-apoptotic proteins Bax (-22%), and FADD (-77%) was lower in EGCg treated plantaris muscles after recovery. While EGCg did not prevent unloading-induced atrophy, it improved muscle recovery after the atrophic stimulus in fast plantaris muscles. However, this effect was muscle specific because EGCg had no major impact in reversing HLS-induced atrophy in the slow soleus muscle of old rats.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84890628188&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84890628188&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.exger.2013.11.011

DO - 10.1016/j.exger.2013.11.011

M3 - Article

VL - 50

SP - 82

EP - 94

JO - Experimental Gerontology

JF - Experimental Gerontology

SN - 0531-5565

IS - 1

ER -