Epilepsy surgery for pediatric low-grade gliomas of the cerebral hemispheres

neurosurgical considerations and outcomes

Matthew T. Brown, Frederick Boop

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Introduction: Pediatric low-grade tumors are found in roughly 1–3 % of patients with childhood epilepsy; seizures associated with these tumors are often medically refractory and often present a significant morbidity, greater than the presence of the tumor itself. Discussion: The unique morbidity of the seizures often requires an epilepsy surgical approach over a standard oncologic resection to achieve a reduction in morbidity for the child. Multiple quality-of-life studies have shown that unless a patient is seizure-free, they remain disabled throughout their life; the best way to achieve this in our patient population is with a multidisciplinary team approach with treatment goals focusing primarily on the epilepsy. Conclusion: In those patients treated with gross total resection, roughly 80 % will have an Engel class I outcome and 90 % will achieve some reduction in seizure frequency with a significant improvement in quality of life.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1923-1930
Number of pages8
JournalChild's Nervous System
Volume32
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2016

Fingerprint

Cerebrum
Glioma
Epilepsy
Seizures
Pediatrics
Morbidity
Quality of Life
Neoplasms
Population
Therapeutics

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Epilepsy surgery for pediatric low-grade gliomas of the cerebral hemispheres : neurosurgical considerations and outcomes. / Brown, Matthew T.; Boop, Frederick.

In: Child's Nervous System, Vol. 32, No. 10, 01.10.2016, p. 1923-1930.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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