Epitope length, genospecies dependency, and serum panel effect in the IR6 enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for detection of antibodies to Borrelia burgdorferi

Maria Gomes-Solecki, Luciana Meirelles, John Glass, Raymond J. Dattwyler

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In the absence of erythema migrans, the basis for diagnosis of Lyme disease is the demonstration of an antibody response against Borrelia burgdorferi in an appropriate clinical setting. The C6 enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, based on the IR6 region of VlsE, has become widely used in both the United States and Europe. We mapped the antigenic epitopes of IR6 to a shorter sequence that is equivalent in sensitivity and specificity to the full-length IR6 25-residue peptide. In addition, we observed significant differences in sensitivity between serum panels (60 to 100%), indicating that the selection of the serum panels can shape the apparent overall sensitivity of the assay. Contrary to prior reports, the assay sensitivity is greater when the IR6 peptide is derived from the sequence of the same infecting Borrelia genospecies. Using our North American panels and the two panels obtained from European Lyme disease patients, we determined that the IR6 assay that is based on a single genospecies of Borrelia spp. is not optimal for use as a universal diagnostic assay for Lyme disease.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)875-879
Number of pages5
JournalClinical and Vaccine Immunology
Volume14
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2007

Fingerprint

Immunosorbents
Borrelia burgdorferi
Lyme Disease
Borrelia
Epitopes
Assays
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
Antibodies
Enzymes
Serum
Peptides
Erythema
Antibody Formation
Sensitivity and Specificity
Demonstrations

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Clinical Biochemistry
  • Immunology
  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Microbiology (medical)

Cite this

Epitope length, genospecies dependency, and serum panel effect in the IR6 enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for detection of antibodies to Borrelia burgdorferi. / Gomes-Solecki, Maria; Meirelles, Luciana; Glass, John; Dattwyler, Raymond J.

In: Clinical and Vaccine Immunology, Vol. 14, No. 7, 01.07.2007, p. 875-879.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "In the absence of erythema migrans, the basis for diagnosis of Lyme disease is the demonstration of an antibody response against Borrelia burgdorferi in an appropriate clinical setting. The C6 enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, based on the IR6 region of VlsE, has become widely used in both the United States and Europe. We mapped the antigenic epitopes of IR6 to a shorter sequence that is equivalent in sensitivity and specificity to the full-length IR6 25-residue peptide. In addition, we observed significant differences in sensitivity between serum panels (60 to 100{\%}), indicating that the selection of the serum panels can shape the apparent overall sensitivity of the assay. Contrary to prior reports, the assay sensitivity is greater when the IR6 peptide is derived from the sequence of the same infecting Borrelia genospecies. Using our North American panels and the two panels obtained from European Lyme disease patients, we determined that the IR6 assay that is based on a single genospecies of Borrelia spp. is not optimal for use as a universal diagnostic assay for Lyme disease.",
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