Ethnic differences and predictors of colonoscopy, prostate-specific antigen, and mammography screening participation in the multiethnic cohort

Brook E. Harmon, Melissa Little, Erica D. Woekel, Reynolette Ettienne, Camonia R. Long, Lynne R. Wilkens, Loic Le Marchand, Brian E. Henderson, Laurence N. Kolonel, Gertraud Maskarinec

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

21 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: Given the relation between screening and improved cancer outcomes and the persistence of ethnic disparities in cancer mortality, we explored ethnic differences in colonoscopy, prostate-specific antigen (PSA), and mammography screening in the Multiethnic Cohort Study. Methods: Logistic regression was applied to examine the influence of ethnicity as well as demographics, lifestyle factors, comorbidities, family history of cancer, and previous screening history on self-reported screening participation collected in 1999-2002. Results: The analysis included 140,398 participants who identified as white, African American, Native Hawaiian, Japanese American, US born-Latino, or Mexican born-Latino. The screening prevalences overall were mammography: 88% of women, PSA: 45% of men, and colonoscopy: 35% of men and women. All minority groups reported 10-40% lower screening utilization than whites, but Mexican-born Latinos and Native Hawaiian were lowest. Men were nearly twice as likely to have a colonoscopy (OR. = 1.94, 95% CI. = 1.89-1.99) as women. A personal screening history, presence of comorbidities, and family history of cancer predicted higher screening utilization across modalities, but to different degrees across ethnic groups. Conclusions: This study confirms previously reported sex differences in colorectal cancer screening and ethnic disparities in screening participation. The findings suggest it may be useful to include personal screening history and family history of cancer into counseling patients about screening participation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)162-167
Number of pages6
JournalCancer Epidemiology
Volume38
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014

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Mammography
Colonoscopy
Prostate-Specific Antigen
Oceanic Ancestry Group
Early Detection of Cancer
Hispanic Americans
History
Comorbidity
Neoplasms
Minority Groups
Asian Americans
Ethnic Groups
Sex Characteristics
African Americans
Life Style
Counseling
Colorectal Neoplasms
Cohort Studies
Logistic Models
Demography

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Epidemiology
  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

Cite this

Ethnic differences and predictors of colonoscopy, prostate-specific antigen, and mammography screening participation in the multiethnic cohort. / Harmon, Brook E.; Little, Melissa; Woekel, Erica D.; Ettienne, Reynolette; Long, Camonia R.; Wilkens, Lynne R.; Le Marchand, Loic; Henderson, Brian E.; Kolonel, Laurence N.; Maskarinec, Gertraud.

In: Cancer Epidemiology, Vol. 38, No. 2, 01.01.2014, p. 162-167.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Harmon, BE, Little, M, Woekel, ED, Ettienne, R, Long, CR, Wilkens, LR, Le Marchand, L, Henderson, BE, Kolonel, LN & Maskarinec, G 2014, 'Ethnic differences and predictors of colonoscopy, prostate-specific antigen, and mammography screening participation in the multiethnic cohort', Cancer Epidemiology, vol. 38, no. 2, pp. 162-167. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.canep.2014.02.007
Harmon, Brook E. ; Little, Melissa ; Woekel, Erica D. ; Ettienne, Reynolette ; Long, Camonia R. ; Wilkens, Lynne R. ; Le Marchand, Loic ; Henderson, Brian E. ; Kolonel, Laurence N. ; Maskarinec, Gertraud. / Ethnic differences and predictors of colonoscopy, prostate-specific antigen, and mammography screening participation in the multiethnic cohort. In: Cancer Epidemiology. 2014 ; Vol. 38, No. 2. pp. 162-167.
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