Evaluating a Community-Partnered Cancer Clinical Trials Pilot Intervention with African American Communities

Melissa A. Green, Margo Michaels, Natasha Blakeney, Adebowale Odulana, Malika Roman Isler, Alan Richmond, Debra G. Long, William S. Robinson, Yhenneko J. Taylor, Giselle Corbie-Smith

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Cancer clinical trial (CCT) accrual and retention rates remain disproportionately low among African Americans. Awarenesss and access to trials are crucial facilitators of trial participation. Strategies developed within a community-based participatory framework (CBPR) are potential solutions to increase awareness and access to CCTs. In this study, we describe the pilot phase of three innovative community-centered modules to improve basic CCT knowledge, awareness of locations to access CCT information, and opportunities to participate in CCTs. Four community organizations completed Community Bridges to CCT training-of-the-trainer and recruited adult African American volunteers to participate in one of three CCT education modules: a workshop about CCTs, a role play describing one person’s experience with CCTs, or a call and response session reviewing myths and facts about CCTs. Pre- and post-test surveys were collected and analyzed using McNemar agreement statistic to evaluate changes in knowledge and attitudes regarding trials. Trainers enrolled 125 participants in the call and response (n = 22), role play (n = 60), and workshop (n = 43) modules. Module participants were mostly African American, female, and with a mean age of 53 years. Comparison of pre- and post-test responses demonstrates favorable changes in awareness of CCTs and where to access CCTs across the sample. Analysis by module type indicates significant increases for participants in the call and response (p < 0.01) and role play modules (p < 0.001), but not the workshop module. Despite measures taken to increase the participation and retention rate of African Americans in clinical trials, little advancement has been made. Developing tailored community education modules on CCTs within the CBPR framework is a promising innovation to increase knowledge about CCTs and favorable attitudes about participation that are known precursors to trial enrollment.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)158-166
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Cancer Education
Volume30
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2015

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African Americans
Clinical Trials
Education
Neoplasms
Volunteers
Organizations

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Oncology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Evaluating a Community-Partnered Cancer Clinical Trials Pilot Intervention with African American Communities. / Green, Melissa A.; Michaels, Margo; Blakeney, Natasha; Odulana, Adebowale; Isler, Malika Roman; Richmond, Alan; Long, Debra G.; Robinson, William S.; Taylor, Yhenneko J.; Corbie-Smith, Giselle.

In: Journal of Cancer Education, Vol. 30, No. 1, 01.01.2015, p. 158-166.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Green, MA, Michaels, M, Blakeney, N, Odulana, A, Isler, MR, Richmond, A, Long, DG, Robinson, WS, Taylor, YJ & Corbie-Smith, G 2015, 'Evaluating a Community-Partnered Cancer Clinical Trials Pilot Intervention with African American Communities', Journal of Cancer Education, vol. 30, no. 1, pp. 158-166. https://doi.org/10.1007/s13187-014-0764-1
Green, Melissa A. ; Michaels, Margo ; Blakeney, Natasha ; Odulana, Adebowale ; Isler, Malika Roman ; Richmond, Alan ; Long, Debra G. ; Robinson, William S. ; Taylor, Yhenneko J. ; Corbie-Smith, Giselle. / Evaluating a Community-Partnered Cancer Clinical Trials Pilot Intervention with African American Communities. In: Journal of Cancer Education. 2015 ; Vol. 30, No. 1. pp. 158-166.
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