Evaluation of Morinda citrifolia as an Endodontic Irrigant

Peter E. Murray, Romi M. Farber, Kenneth N. Namerow, Sergio Kuttler, Franklin Garcia-Godoy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

66 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to compare the in vitro effectiveness of Morinda citrifolia juice (MCJ) with sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) and chlorhexidine gluconate (CHX) to remove the smear layer from the canal walls of endodontically instrumented teeth. Sixty extracted, single-rooted, mature, permanent, human premolar teeth with a single canal were inoculated with Enterococcus faecalis at 37°C in a CO2 atmosphere for 30 days. The teeth were randomly allocated to 6 treatment groups; the pulp chamber was accessed, cleaned, and shaped by using ProTaper and ProFile rotary instrumentation to a size 35. During instrumentation the irrigation was provided by MCJ, NaOCl, CHX, MCJ/CHX, followed by a final flush of 17% ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA). MCJ irrigation was also followed by a final flush of saline, and saline irrigation was also used as a negative control. The teeth were then processed for scanning electron microscopy, and the removal of smear layer was examined. Data were analyzed by χ2 statistical tests (P values) at a significance of 95%. The most effective removal of smear layer occurred with MCJ and NaOCl, both with a rinse of 17% EDTA. Both MCJ and NaOCl treatments were similarly effective with a rinse of 17% EDTA (P < .2471) to completely remove up to 80% of the smear layer from some aspects of the root canal. MCJ was more effective than CHX for removing smear layer (P < .0085) and saline as the negative control (P < .0001). The efficacy of MJC was similar to NaOCl in conjunction with EDTA as an intracanal irrigant. MJC appears to be the first fruit juice to be identified as a possible alternative to the use of NaOCl as an intracanal irrigant.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)66-70
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Endodontics
Volume34
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2008
Externally publishedYes

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Morinda
Endodontics
Smear Layer
Edetic Acid
Tooth
Dental Pulp Cavity
Sodium Hypochlorite
Enterococcus faecalis
Bicuspid
Atmosphere
Electron Scanning Microscopy
chlorhexidine gluconate

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Dentistry(all)

Cite this

Evaluation of Morinda citrifolia as an Endodontic Irrigant. / Murray, Peter E.; Farber, Romi M.; Namerow, Kenneth N.; Kuttler, Sergio; Garcia-Godoy, Franklin.

In: Journal of Endodontics, Vol. 34, No. 1, 01.01.2008, p. 66-70.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Murray, Peter E. ; Farber, Romi M. ; Namerow, Kenneth N. ; Kuttler, Sergio ; Garcia-Godoy, Franklin. / Evaluation of Morinda citrifolia as an Endodontic Irrigant. In: Journal of Endodontics. 2008 ; Vol. 34, No. 1. pp. 66-70.
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abstract = "The purpose of this study was to compare the in vitro effectiveness of Morinda citrifolia juice (MCJ) with sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) and chlorhexidine gluconate (CHX) to remove the smear layer from the canal walls of endodontically instrumented teeth. Sixty extracted, single-rooted, mature, permanent, human premolar teeth with a single canal were inoculated with Enterococcus faecalis at 37°C in a CO2 atmosphere for 30 days. The teeth were randomly allocated to 6 treatment groups; the pulp chamber was accessed, cleaned, and shaped by using ProTaper and ProFile rotary instrumentation to a size 35. During instrumentation the irrigation was provided by MCJ, NaOCl, CHX, MCJ/CHX, followed by a final flush of 17{\%} ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA). MCJ irrigation was also followed by a final flush of saline, and saline irrigation was also used as a negative control. The teeth were then processed for scanning electron microscopy, and the removal of smear layer was examined. Data were analyzed by χ2 statistical tests (P values) at a significance of 95{\%}. The most effective removal of smear layer occurred with MCJ and NaOCl, both with a rinse of 17{\%} EDTA. Both MCJ and NaOCl treatments were similarly effective with a rinse of 17{\%} EDTA (P < .2471) to completely remove up to 80{\%} of the smear layer from some aspects of the root canal. MCJ was more effective than CHX for removing smear layer (P < .0085) and saline as the negative control (P < .0001). The efficacy of MJC was similar to NaOCl in conjunction with EDTA as an intracanal irrigant. MJC appears to be the first fruit juice to be identified as a possible alternative to the use of NaOCl as an intracanal irrigant.",
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