Evaluation of ten anaerobic blood culture media

R. F. Schell, Jegdish Babu, J. L. Le Frock

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Selection of an anearobic blood culture medium for use in the clinical microbiology laboratory is usually based upon clinical findings that have compared the isolation rates of bacteremic agents from different blood culture media. No agreement has been reached as to which of the commercially available blood culture media is optimal for detection of bacteremia. The purpose of this study was to determine the rates of recovery of anaerobic microorganisms from various anaerobic blood culture media. The blood culture media were inoculated with a small inoculum of microorganisms in the presence or absence of an erythrocyte-serum mixture. The results demonstrated that the type of medium and the erythrocyte-serum mixture influenced the ability of blood culture media to support the growth of microorganisms. The majority of the media failed to support the growth of 87% or more of the microorganisms within four days after inoculation. Pre-reduced brain-heart infusion broth supported the growth of a larger proportion of microorganisms than the other types of blood culture media.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)199-203
Number of pages5
JournalAmerican Journal of Clinical Pathology
Volume72
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1979
Externally publishedYes

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Culture Media
Growth
Erythrocytes
Bacteremia
Microbiology
Blood Culture
Serum
Brain

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine

Cite this

Evaluation of ten anaerobic blood culture media. / Schell, R. F.; Babu, Jegdish; Le Frock, J. L.

In: American Journal of Clinical Pathology, Vol. 72, No. 2, 01.01.1979, p. 199-203.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Schell, R. F. ; Babu, Jegdish ; Le Frock, J. L. / Evaluation of ten anaerobic blood culture media. In: American Journal of Clinical Pathology. 1979 ; Vol. 72, No. 2. pp. 199-203.
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