Evidence of a gene-environment interaction that predisposes to spontaneous preterm birth

a role for asymptomatic bacterial vaginosis and DNA variants in genes that control the inflammatory response

Luis Gomez Carbajal, Mary D. Sammel, Dina H. Appleby, Michal A. Elovitz, Don A. Baldwin, Marjorie K. Jeffcoat, George A. Macones, Samuel Parry

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

53 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: We determined whether an environmental exposure to bacterial vaginosis (BV) modified genetic susceptibilities for spontaneous preterm delivery within genes that regulate the inflammatory response. Study Design: Maternal DNA samples and vaginal smears for Gram staining were collected from 743 women (68 preterm births). We used a 1536-single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) custom chip to study associations between genotype distributions and preterm birth. Results: For 8 SNPs in 3 genes (protein kinase C alpha, fms-like tyrosine kinase 1, and interleukin 6), the odds ratios for preterm birth ranged from 1.9-4.0 among women with susceptible genotypes who were BV positive. The odds ratios for preterm birth were 2.0-5.0 times greater among women who were BV positive than among women who were BV negative. The significance of these differences was demonstrated by logistic regression analyses for genotype/BV interaction. Conclusion: These results demonstrate that the risk of preterm delivery that is associated with tag SNPs in genes that regulate the inflammatory response is modified by an environmental exposure such as bacterial vaginosis.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)386.e1-386.e6
JournalAmerican Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology
Volume202
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2010

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Bacterial Vaginosis
Bacterial DNA
Gene-Environment Interaction
Premature Birth
Genes
Single Nucleotide Polymorphism
Genotype
Environmental Exposure
Odds Ratio
Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor-1
Protein Kinase C-alpha
Vaginal Smears
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Interleukin-6
Logistic Models
Regression Analysis
Mothers
Staining and Labeling
DNA
Proteins

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

Cite this

Evidence of a gene-environment interaction that predisposes to spontaneous preterm birth : a role for asymptomatic bacterial vaginosis and DNA variants in genes that control the inflammatory response. / Gomez Carbajal, Luis; Sammel, Mary D.; Appleby, Dina H.; Elovitz, Michal A.; Baldwin, Don A.; Jeffcoat, Marjorie K.; Macones, George A.; Parry, Samuel.

In: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Vol. 202, No. 4, 01.01.2010, p. 386.e1-386.e6.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Gomez Carbajal, Luis ; Sammel, Mary D. ; Appleby, Dina H. ; Elovitz, Michal A. ; Baldwin, Don A. ; Jeffcoat, Marjorie K. ; Macones, George A. ; Parry, Samuel. / Evidence of a gene-environment interaction that predisposes to spontaneous preterm birth : a role for asymptomatic bacterial vaginosis and DNA variants in genes that control the inflammatory response. In: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology. 2010 ; Vol. 202, No. 4. pp. 386.e1-386.e6.
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