Examination of costs for a lay health educator-delivered translation of the Diabetes Prevention Program in senior centers

Rebecca Krukowski, Rebecca A. Pope, Sha Rhonda Love, Shelly Lensing, Holly C. Felix, T. Elaine Prewitt, Delia West

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: Older adults in the U.S. have high rates of obesity. Despite the demonstrated efficacy of lifestyle interventions among older adults, lifestyle interventions are not widely implemented in community settings. Program delivery by lay health educators (LHEs) might support greater dissemination because of lower delivery cost and greater accessibility. We examined the costs of a LHE-delivered translation of the Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP) evidence-based lifestyle intervention for older adults in Arkansas senior centers. Methods: This examination of costs used data from a cluster randomized control trial (conducted 2008-2010) in which 7 senior centers (116 participants) were randomized to implement a LHE-delivered 12-session translation of the DPP lifestyle intervention. We compiled direct lifestyle intervention implementation costs, including training, recruitment, materials, and ongoing intervention implementation support. Weight loss data (at 4-month follow-up) were collected from participants. Results: Participant weight loss averaged 3.7. kg at 4-months. The total estimated cost to implement the lifestyle intervention is $2731 per senior center, or $165 per participant. The implementation cost per kilogram lost is $45. Conclusions: A LHE-delivered DPP translation in senior centers is effective in achieving weight loss at low cost and offers promise for the dissemination of this evidence-based intervention.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)400-402
Number of pages3
JournalPreventive Medicine
Volume57
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2013

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Senior Centers
Health Educators
Life Style
Costs and Cost Analysis
Weight Loss
Obesity

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Epidemiology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Examination of costs for a lay health educator-delivered translation of the Diabetes Prevention Program in senior centers. / Krukowski, Rebecca; Pope, Rebecca A.; Love, Sha Rhonda; Lensing, Shelly; Felix, Holly C.; Prewitt, T. Elaine; West, Delia.

In: Preventive Medicine, Vol. 57, No. 4, 01.10.2013, p. 400-402.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Krukowski, Rebecca ; Pope, Rebecca A. ; Love, Sha Rhonda ; Lensing, Shelly ; Felix, Holly C. ; Prewitt, T. Elaine ; West, Delia. / Examination of costs for a lay health educator-delivered translation of the Diabetes Prevention Program in senior centers. In: Preventive Medicine. 2013 ; Vol. 57, No. 4. pp. 400-402.
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