Excess body weight and colorectal cancer survival

the multiethnic cohort

Gertraud Maskarinec, Brook E. Harmon, Melissa Little, Nicholas J. Ollberding, Laurence N. Kolonel, Brian E. Henderson, Loic Le Marchand, Lynne R. Wilkens

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: Excess body weight is a risk factor for colorectal cancer (CRC) and may also adversely affect survival in CRC patients. Methods: This study examined the relation of body mass index (BMI), which was self-reported at cohort entry and after 5.7 ± 0.8 years, with CRC-specific and all-cause survival among 4,204 incident cases of invasive CRC in the multiethnic cohort. Cox regression analysis with age as time metric and BMI as time-varying exposure was applied to estimate hazard ratios (HR) and 95 % confidence intervals (CIs) while adjusting for relevant covariates. Results: Over 6.0 ± 4.7 years of follow-up, 1,976 all-cause and 1,095 CRC-specific deaths were recorded. The mean time interval between cohort entry and diagnosis was 7.6 ± 4.7 years. No association with CRC-specific survival was detected in men (HR5units = 0.94; 95 %CI 0.84–1.04) or women (HR5units = 0.98; 95 %CI 0.89–1.08). In men, all-cause survival also showed no relation with BMI (HR5unit = 0.97; 95 %CI 0.90–1.06), whereas it was reduced in women (HR5units = 1.10; 95 %CI 1.03–1.18). Interactions of BMI with ethnicity were only significant for obesity. Obese Latino and overweight Native Hawaiian men as well as overweight African-American women experienced significantly better CRC-specific survival than whites. Overweight Japanese men and African-American women had better all-cause survival and obese Latino women had the lowest all-cause survival (HRobese = 1.74; 95 %CI 1.08–2.80). Conclusions: This analysis detected little evidence for an adverse effect of excess body weight on CRC-specific survival, but all-cause survival was reduced in women. These findings suggest that adiposity may be less important for CRC survival than as an etiologic factor.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1709-1718
Number of pages10
JournalCancer Causes and Control
Volume26
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 10 2015

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Colorectal Neoplasms
Body Weight
Survival
Confidence Intervals
Body Mass Index
Hispanic Americans
African Americans
Oceanic Ancestry Group
Adiposity
Obesity
Regression Analysis

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

Cite this

Maskarinec, G., Harmon, B. E., Little, M., Ollberding, N. J., Kolonel, L. N., Henderson, B. E., ... Wilkens, L. R. (2015). Excess body weight and colorectal cancer survival: the multiethnic cohort. Cancer Causes and Control, 26(12), 1709-1718. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10552-015-0664-7

Excess body weight and colorectal cancer survival : the multiethnic cohort. / Maskarinec, Gertraud; Harmon, Brook E.; Little, Melissa; Ollberding, Nicholas J.; Kolonel, Laurence N.; Henderson, Brian E.; Le Marchand, Loic; Wilkens, Lynne R.

In: Cancer Causes and Control, Vol. 26, No. 12, 10.09.2015, p. 1709-1718.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Maskarinec, G, Harmon, BE, Little, M, Ollberding, NJ, Kolonel, LN, Henderson, BE, Le Marchand, L & Wilkens, LR 2015, 'Excess body weight and colorectal cancer survival: the multiethnic cohort', Cancer Causes and Control, vol. 26, no. 12, pp. 1709-1718. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10552-015-0664-7
Maskarinec G, Harmon BE, Little M, Ollberding NJ, Kolonel LN, Henderson BE et al. Excess body weight and colorectal cancer survival: the multiethnic cohort. Cancer Causes and Control. 2015 Sep 10;26(12):1709-1718. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10552-015-0664-7
Maskarinec, Gertraud ; Harmon, Brook E. ; Little, Melissa ; Ollberding, Nicholas J. ; Kolonel, Laurence N. ; Henderson, Brian E. ; Le Marchand, Loic ; Wilkens, Lynne R. / Excess body weight and colorectal cancer survival : the multiethnic cohort. In: Cancer Causes and Control. 2015 ; Vol. 26, No. 12. pp. 1709-1718.
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abstract = "Purpose: Excess body weight is a risk factor for colorectal cancer (CRC) and may also adversely affect survival in CRC patients. Methods: This study examined the relation of body mass index (BMI), which was self-reported at cohort entry and after 5.7 ± 0.8 years, with CRC-specific and all-cause survival among 4,204 incident cases of invasive CRC in the multiethnic cohort. Cox regression analysis with age as time metric and BMI as time-varying exposure was applied to estimate hazard ratios (HR) and 95 {\%} confidence intervals (CIs) while adjusting for relevant covariates. Results: Over 6.0 ± 4.7 years of follow-up, 1,976 all-cause and 1,095 CRC-specific deaths were recorded. The mean time interval between cohort entry and diagnosis was 7.6 ± 4.7 years. No association with CRC-specific survival was detected in men (HR5units = 0.94; 95 {\%}CI 0.84–1.04) or women (HR5units = 0.98; 95 {\%}CI 0.89–1.08). In men, all-cause survival also showed no relation with BMI (HR5unit = 0.97; 95 {\%}CI 0.90–1.06), whereas it was reduced in women (HR5units = 1.10; 95 {\%}CI 1.03–1.18). Interactions of BMI with ethnicity were only significant for obesity. Obese Latino and overweight Native Hawaiian men as well as overweight African-American women experienced significantly better CRC-specific survival than whites. Overweight Japanese men and African-American women had better all-cause survival and obese Latino women had the lowest all-cause survival (HRobese = 1.74; 95 {\%}CI 1.08–2.80). Conclusions: This analysis detected little evidence for an adverse effect of excess body weight on CRC-specific survival, but all-cause survival was reduced in women. These findings suggest that adiposity may be less important for CRC survival than as an etiologic factor.",
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AU - Kolonel, Laurence N.

AU - Henderson, Brian E.

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N2 - Purpose: Excess body weight is a risk factor for colorectal cancer (CRC) and may also adversely affect survival in CRC patients. Methods: This study examined the relation of body mass index (BMI), which was self-reported at cohort entry and after 5.7 ± 0.8 years, with CRC-specific and all-cause survival among 4,204 incident cases of invasive CRC in the multiethnic cohort. Cox regression analysis with age as time metric and BMI as time-varying exposure was applied to estimate hazard ratios (HR) and 95 % confidence intervals (CIs) while adjusting for relevant covariates. Results: Over 6.0 ± 4.7 years of follow-up, 1,976 all-cause and 1,095 CRC-specific deaths were recorded. The mean time interval between cohort entry and diagnosis was 7.6 ± 4.7 years. No association with CRC-specific survival was detected in men (HR5units = 0.94; 95 %CI 0.84–1.04) or women (HR5units = 0.98; 95 %CI 0.89–1.08). In men, all-cause survival also showed no relation with BMI (HR5unit = 0.97; 95 %CI 0.90–1.06), whereas it was reduced in women (HR5units = 1.10; 95 %CI 1.03–1.18). Interactions of BMI with ethnicity were only significant for obesity. Obese Latino and overweight Native Hawaiian men as well as overweight African-American women experienced significantly better CRC-specific survival than whites. Overweight Japanese men and African-American women had better all-cause survival and obese Latino women had the lowest all-cause survival (HRobese = 1.74; 95 %CI 1.08–2.80). Conclusions: This analysis detected little evidence for an adverse effect of excess body weight on CRC-specific survival, but all-cause survival was reduced in women. These findings suggest that adiposity may be less important for CRC survival than as an etiologic factor.

AB - Purpose: Excess body weight is a risk factor for colorectal cancer (CRC) and may also adversely affect survival in CRC patients. Methods: This study examined the relation of body mass index (BMI), which was self-reported at cohort entry and after 5.7 ± 0.8 years, with CRC-specific and all-cause survival among 4,204 incident cases of invasive CRC in the multiethnic cohort. Cox regression analysis with age as time metric and BMI as time-varying exposure was applied to estimate hazard ratios (HR) and 95 % confidence intervals (CIs) while adjusting for relevant covariates. Results: Over 6.0 ± 4.7 years of follow-up, 1,976 all-cause and 1,095 CRC-specific deaths were recorded. The mean time interval between cohort entry and diagnosis was 7.6 ± 4.7 years. No association with CRC-specific survival was detected in men (HR5units = 0.94; 95 %CI 0.84–1.04) or women (HR5units = 0.98; 95 %CI 0.89–1.08). In men, all-cause survival also showed no relation with BMI (HR5unit = 0.97; 95 %CI 0.90–1.06), whereas it was reduced in women (HR5units = 1.10; 95 %CI 1.03–1.18). Interactions of BMI with ethnicity were only significant for obesity. Obese Latino and overweight Native Hawaiian men as well as overweight African-American women experienced significantly better CRC-specific survival than whites. Overweight Japanese men and African-American women had better all-cause survival and obese Latino women had the lowest all-cause survival (HRobese = 1.74; 95 %CI 1.08–2.80). Conclusions: This analysis detected little evidence for an adverse effect of excess body weight on CRC-specific survival, but all-cause survival was reduced in women. These findings suggest that adiposity may be less important for CRC survival than as an etiologic factor.

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