Excessive loss of skeletal muscle mass in older adults with type 2 diabetes

Won Park Seok, Bret H. Goodpaster, Sun Lee Jung, Lewis H. Kuller, Robert Boudreau, Nathalie De Rekeneire, Tamara B. Harris, Stephen Kritchevsky, Frances Tylavsky, Michael Nevitt, Yong Wook Cho, Anne B. Newman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

OBJECTIVE - A loss of skeletal muscle mass is frequently observed in older adults. The aim of the study was to investigate the impact of type 2 diabetes on the changes in body composition, with particular interest in the skeletal muscle mass. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS - We examined total body composition with dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry annually for 6 years in 2,675 older adults. We also measured mid-thigh muscle cross-sectional area (CSA) with computed tomography in year 1 and year 6. At baseline, 75-g oral glucose challenge tests were performed. Diagnosed diabetes (n = 402, 15.0%) was identified by self-report or use of hypoglycemic agents. Undiagnosed diabetes (n = 226, 8.4%) was defined by fasting plasma glucose (≥7 mmol/l) or 2-h postchallenge plasma glucose (≥11.1 mmol/l). Longitudinal regression models were fit to examine the effect of diabetes on the changes in body composition variables. RESULTS - Older adults with either diagnosed or undiagnosed type 2 diabetes showed excessive loss of appendicular lean mass and trunk fat mass compared with nondiabetic subjects. Thigh muscle CSA declined two times faster in older women with diabetes than their nondiabetic counterparts. These findings remained significant after adjusting for age, sex, race, clinic site, baseline BMI, weight change intention, and actual weight changes over time. CONCLUSIONS - Type 2 diabetes is associated with excessive loss of skeletal muscle and trunk fat mass in community-dwelling older adults. Older women with type 2 diabetes are at especially high risk for loss of skeletal muscle mass.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1993-1997
Number of pages5
JournalDiabetes care
Volume32
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2009

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Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus
Skeletal Muscle
Body Composition
Thigh
Glucose
Fats
Independent Living
Weights and Measures
Muscles
Photon Absorptiometry
Hypoglycemic Agents
Self Report
Fasting
Research Design
Tomography

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Internal Medicine
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Advanced and Specialized Nursing

Cite this

Seok, W. P., Goodpaster, B. H., Jung, S. L., Kuller, L. H., Boudreau, R., De Rekeneire, N., ... Newman, A. B. (2009). Excessive loss of skeletal muscle mass in older adults with type 2 diabetes. Diabetes care, 32(11), 1993-1997. https://doi.org/10.2337/dc09-0264

Excessive loss of skeletal muscle mass in older adults with type 2 diabetes. / Seok, Won Park; Goodpaster, Bret H.; Jung, Sun Lee; Kuller, Lewis H.; Boudreau, Robert; De Rekeneire, Nathalie; Harris, Tamara B.; Kritchevsky, Stephen; Tylavsky, Frances; Nevitt, Michael; Cho, Yong Wook; Newman, Anne B.

In: Diabetes care, Vol. 32, No. 11, 01.11.2009, p. 1993-1997.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Seok, WP, Goodpaster, BH, Jung, SL, Kuller, LH, Boudreau, R, De Rekeneire, N, Harris, TB, Kritchevsky, S, Tylavsky, F, Nevitt, M, Cho, YW & Newman, AB 2009, 'Excessive loss of skeletal muscle mass in older adults with type 2 diabetes', Diabetes care, vol. 32, no. 11, pp. 1993-1997. https://doi.org/10.2337/dc09-0264
Seok WP, Goodpaster BH, Jung SL, Kuller LH, Boudreau R, De Rekeneire N et al. Excessive loss of skeletal muscle mass in older adults with type 2 diabetes. Diabetes care. 2009 Nov 1;32(11):1993-1997. https://doi.org/10.2337/dc09-0264
Seok, Won Park ; Goodpaster, Bret H. ; Jung, Sun Lee ; Kuller, Lewis H. ; Boudreau, Robert ; De Rekeneire, Nathalie ; Harris, Tamara B. ; Kritchevsky, Stephen ; Tylavsky, Frances ; Nevitt, Michael ; Cho, Yong Wook ; Newman, Anne B. / Excessive loss of skeletal muscle mass in older adults with type 2 diabetes. In: Diabetes care. 2009 ; Vol. 32, No. 11. pp. 1993-1997.
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abstract = "OBJECTIVE - A loss of skeletal muscle mass is frequently observed in older adults. The aim of the study was to investigate the impact of type 2 diabetes on the changes in body composition, with particular interest in the skeletal muscle mass. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS - We examined total body composition with dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry annually for 6 years in 2,675 older adults. We also measured mid-thigh muscle cross-sectional area (CSA) with computed tomography in year 1 and year 6. At baseline, 75-g oral glucose challenge tests were performed. Diagnosed diabetes (n = 402, 15.0{\%}) was identified by self-report or use of hypoglycemic agents. Undiagnosed diabetes (n = 226, 8.4{\%}) was defined by fasting plasma glucose (≥7 mmol/l) or 2-h postchallenge plasma glucose (≥11.1 mmol/l). Longitudinal regression models were fit to examine the effect of diabetes on the changes in body composition variables. RESULTS - Older adults with either diagnosed or undiagnosed type 2 diabetes showed excessive loss of appendicular lean mass and trunk fat mass compared with nondiabetic subjects. Thigh muscle CSA declined two times faster in older women with diabetes than their nondiabetic counterparts. These findings remained significant after adjusting for age, sex, race, clinic site, baseline BMI, weight change intention, and actual weight changes over time. CONCLUSIONS - Type 2 diabetes is associated with excessive loss of skeletal muscle and trunk fat mass in community-dwelling older adults. Older women with type 2 diabetes are at especially high risk for loss of skeletal muscle mass.",
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AU - De Rekeneire, Nathalie

AU - Harris, Tamara B.

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AB - OBJECTIVE - A loss of skeletal muscle mass is frequently observed in older adults. The aim of the study was to investigate the impact of type 2 diabetes on the changes in body composition, with particular interest in the skeletal muscle mass. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS - We examined total body composition with dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry annually for 6 years in 2,675 older adults. We also measured mid-thigh muscle cross-sectional area (CSA) with computed tomography in year 1 and year 6. At baseline, 75-g oral glucose challenge tests were performed. Diagnosed diabetes (n = 402, 15.0%) was identified by self-report or use of hypoglycemic agents. Undiagnosed diabetes (n = 226, 8.4%) was defined by fasting plasma glucose (≥7 mmol/l) or 2-h postchallenge plasma glucose (≥11.1 mmol/l). Longitudinal regression models were fit to examine the effect of diabetes on the changes in body composition variables. RESULTS - Older adults with either diagnosed or undiagnosed type 2 diabetes showed excessive loss of appendicular lean mass and trunk fat mass compared with nondiabetic subjects. Thigh muscle CSA declined two times faster in older women with diabetes than their nondiabetic counterparts. These findings remained significant after adjusting for age, sex, race, clinic site, baseline BMI, weight change intention, and actual weight changes over time. CONCLUSIONS - Type 2 diabetes is associated with excessive loss of skeletal muscle and trunk fat mass in community-dwelling older adults. Older women with type 2 diabetes are at especially high risk for loss of skeletal muscle mass.

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