Excimer laser treatment of spherical hyperopia

PRK or LASIK?

M. S.H. El-Agha, E. W. Johnston, R. W. Bowman, H. D. Cavanagh, J. P. McCulley, Penny Asbell, M. L. Mazow, I. R. Schwab, G. L. Spaeth, V. S. Nirankari, D. J. Schanzlin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

30 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: To compare the efficacy and safety of photorefractive keratectomy (PRK) and laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) in the treatment of spherical hyperopia with use of the VISX STAR S2™ excimer laser. Methods: A review of 15 consecutive patients (22 eyes) receiving PRK and 22 consecutive patients (26 eyes) receiving LASIK (median follow-up, 12 months). Results: Mean age was 52 ± 7 years for patients receiving PRK and 55 ± 9 years for patients receiving LASIK. Mean preoperative spherical equivalent was +2.25 ± 1.16 D for PRK patients and +1.81 ± 0.92 D for LASIK patients. Mean deviation from intended correction was -0.82 ± 0.89 D after PRK and +0.19 ± 0.47 D after LASIK at 1 month (P <.01); +0.16 D ± 0.37 D after PRK and +0.29 ± 0.51 D after LASIK at 6 months (P = .906); +0.20 ± 0.35 D after PRK and +0.37 ± 0.44 D after LASIK at 1 year (P = .301). At 1 year, 83.3% of PRK eyes and 61.5% of hyperopic LASIK eyes were within ± 0.50 D of intended correction (P = 1.0). At 1 year, all eyes in both groups had acuity of 20/40 or better uncorrected, and 47.1% of PRK eyes and 54.5% of LASIK eyes had acuity of 20/20 or better uncorrected (P = 1.0). At last follow-up (minimum, 6 months), 2 eyes in each group had lost 2 lines of best spectacle-correct visual acuity, but none had lost more than 2 lines. All PRK patients experienced significant postoperative pain that required systemic medication. LASIK patients had only minor, transient discomfort. Conclusion: LASIK and PRK are of comparable efficacy and safety. However, PRK was associated with significant postoperative pain, an initial and temporary myopic overshoot peaking at 1 month, and stability not occurring before 6 months. LASIK was less painful and was associated with more rapid stability (at 1 month) and a trend toward better uncorrected visual acuity, although not statistically significant.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)59-69
Number of pages11
JournalTransactions of the American Ophthalmological Society
Volume98
StatePublished - Dec 1 2000
Externally publishedYes

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Photorefractive Keratectomy
Hyperopia
Excimer Lasers
Laser In Situ Keratomileusis
Therapeutics
Postoperative Pain
Visual Acuity
Safety

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Ophthalmology

Cite this

El-Agha, M. S. H., Johnston, E. W., Bowman, R. W., Cavanagh, H. D., McCulley, J. P., Asbell, P., ... Schanzlin, D. J. (2000). Excimer laser treatment of spherical hyperopia: PRK or LASIK? Transactions of the American Ophthalmological Society, 98, 59-69.

Excimer laser treatment of spherical hyperopia : PRK or LASIK? / El-Agha, M. S.H.; Johnston, E. W.; Bowman, R. W.; Cavanagh, H. D.; McCulley, J. P.; Asbell, Penny; Mazow, M. L.; Schwab, I. R.; Spaeth, G. L.; Nirankari, V. S.; Schanzlin, D. J.

In: Transactions of the American Ophthalmological Society, Vol. 98, 01.12.2000, p. 59-69.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

El-Agha, MSH, Johnston, EW, Bowman, RW, Cavanagh, HD, McCulley, JP, Asbell, P, Mazow, ML, Schwab, IR, Spaeth, GL, Nirankari, VS & Schanzlin, DJ 2000, 'Excimer laser treatment of spherical hyperopia: PRK or LASIK?', Transactions of the American Ophthalmological Society, vol. 98, pp. 59-69.
El-Agha MSH, Johnston EW, Bowman RW, Cavanagh HD, McCulley JP, Asbell P et al. Excimer laser treatment of spherical hyperopia: PRK or LASIK? Transactions of the American Ophthalmological Society. 2000 Dec 1;98:59-69.
El-Agha, M. S.H. ; Johnston, E. W. ; Bowman, R. W. ; Cavanagh, H. D. ; McCulley, J. P. ; Asbell, Penny ; Mazow, M. L. ; Schwab, I. R. ; Spaeth, G. L. ; Nirankari, V. S. ; Schanzlin, D. J. / Excimer laser treatment of spherical hyperopia : PRK or LASIK?. In: Transactions of the American Ophthalmological Society. 2000 ; Vol. 98. pp. 59-69.
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title = "Excimer laser treatment of spherical hyperopia: PRK or LASIK?",
abstract = "Purpose: To compare the efficacy and safety of photorefractive keratectomy (PRK) and laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) in the treatment of spherical hyperopia with use of the VISX STAR S2™ excimer laser. Methods: A review of 15 consecutive patients (22 eyes) receiving PRK and 22 consecutive patients (26 eyes) receiving LASIK (median follow-up, 12 months). Results: Mean age was 52 ± 7 years for patients receiving PRK and 55 ± 9 years for patients receiving LASIK. Mean preoperative spherical equivalent was +2.25 ± 1.16 D for PRK patients and +1.81 ± 0.92 D for LASIK patients. Mean deviation from intended correction was -0.82 ± 0.89 D after PRK and +0.19 ± 0.47 D after LASIK at 1 month (P <.01); +0.16 D ± 0.37 D after PRK and +0.29 ± 0.51 D after LASIK at 6 months (P = .906); +0.20 ± 0.35 D after PRK and +0.37 ± 0.44 D after LASIK at 1 year (P = .301). At 1 year, 83.3{\%} of PRK eyes and 61.5{\%} of hyperopic LASIK eyes were within ± 0.50 D of intended correction (P = 1.0). At 1 year, all eyes in both groups had acuity of 20/40 or better uncorrected, and 47.1{\%} of PRK eyes and 54.5{\%} of LASIK eyes had acuity of 20/20 or better uncorrected (P = 1.0). At last follow-up (minimum, 6 months), 2 eyes in each group had lost 2 lines of best spectacle-correct visual acuity, but none had lost more than 2 lines. All PRK patients experienced significant postoperative pain that required systemic medication. LASIK patients had only minor, transient discomfort. Conclusion: LASIK and PRK are of comparable efficacy and safety. However, PRK was associated with significant postoperative pain, an initial and temporary myopic overshoot peaking at 1 month, and stability not occurring before 6 months. LASIK was less painful and was associated with more rapid stability (at 1 month) and a trend toward better uncorrected visual acuity, although not statistically significant.",
author = "El-Agha, {M. S.H.} and Johnston, {E. W.} and Bowman, {R. W.} and Cavanagh, {H. D.} and McCulley, {J. P.} and Penny Asbell and Mazow, {M. L.} and Schwab, {I. R.} and Spaeth, {G. L.} and Nirankari, {V. S.} and Schanzlin, {D. J.}",
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T1 - Excimer laser treatment of spherical hyperopia

T2 - PRK or LASIK?

AU - El-Agha, M. S.H.

AU - Johnston, E. W.

AU - Bowman, R. W.

AU - Cavanagh, H. D.

AU - McCulley, J. P.

AU - Asbell, Penny

AU - Mazow, M. L.

AU - Schwab, I. R.

AU - Spaeth, G. L.

AU - Nirankari, V. S.

AU - Schanzlin, D. J.

PY - 2000/12/1

Y1 - 2000/12/1

N2 - Purpose: To compare the efficacy and safety of photorefractive keratectomy (PRK) and laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) in the treatment of spherical hyperopia with use of the VISX STAR S2™ excimer laser. Methods: A review of 15 consecutive patients (22 eyes) receiving PRK and 22 consecutive patients (26 eyes) receiving LASIK (median follow-up, 12 months). Results: Mean age was 52 ± 7 years for patients receiving PRK and 55 ± 9 years for patients receiving LASIK. Mean preoperative spherical equivalent was +2.25 ± 1.16 D for PRK patients and +1.81 ± 0.92 D for LASIK patients. Mean deviation from intended correction was -0.82 ± 0.89 D after PRK and +0.19 ± 0.47 D after LASIK at 1 month (P <.01); +0.16 D ± 0.37 D after PRK and +0.29 ± 0.51 D after LASIK at 6 months (P = .906); +0.20 ± 0.35 D after PRK and +0.37 ± 0.44 D after LASIK at 1 year (P = .301). At 1 year, 83.3% of PRK eyes and 61.5% of hyperopic LASIK eyes were within ± 0.50 D of intended correction (P = 1.0). At 1 year, all eyes in both groups had acuity of 20/40 or better uncorrected, and 47.1% of PRK eyes and 54.5% of LASIK eyes had acuity of 20/20 or better uncorrected (P = 1.0). At last follow-up (minimum, 6 months), 2 eyes in each group had lost 2 lines of best spectacle-correct visual acuity, but none had lost more than 2 lines. All PRK patients experienced significant postoperative pain that required systemic medication. LASIK patients had only minor, transient discomfort. Conclusion: LASIK and PRK are of comparable efficacy and safety. However, PRK was associated with significant postoperative pain, an initial and temporary myopic overshoot peaking at 1 month, and stability not occurring before 6 months. LASIK was less painful and was associated with more rapid stability (at 1 month) and a trend toward better uncorrected visual acuity, although not statistically significant.

AB - Purpose: To compare the efficacy and safety of photorefractive keratectomy (PRK) and laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) in the treatment of spherical hyperopia with use of the VISX STAR S2™ excimer laser. Methods: A review of 15 consecutive patients (22 eyes) receiving PRK and 22 consecutive patients (26 eyes) receiving LASIK (median follow-up, 12 months). Results: Mean age was 52 ± 7 years for patients receiving PRK and 55 ± 9 years for patients receiving LASIK. Mean preoperative spherical equivalent was +2.25 ± 1.16 D for PRK patients and +1.81 ± 0.92 D for LASIK patients. Mean deviation from intended correction was -0.82 ± 0.89 D after PRK and +0.19 ± 0.47 D after LASIK at 1 month (P <.01); +0.16 D ± 0.37 D after PRK and +0.29 ± 0.51 D after LASIK at 6 months (P = .906); +0.20 ± 0.35 D after PRK and +0.37 ± 0.44 D after LASIK at 1 year (P = .301). At 1 year, 83.3% of PRK eyes and 61.5% of hyperopic LASIK eyes were within ± 0.50 D of intended correction (P = 1.0). At 1 year, all eyes in both groups had acuity of 20/40 or better uncorrected, and 47.1% of PRK eyes and 54.5% of LASIK eyes had acuity of 20/20 or better uncorrected (P = 1.0). At last follow-up (minimum, 6 months), 2 eyes in each group had lost 2 lines of best spectacle-correct visual acuity, but none had lost more than 2 lines. All PRK patients experienced significant postoperative pain that required systemic medication. LASIK patients had only minor, transient discomfort. Conclusion: LASIK and PRK are of comparable efficacy and safety. However, PRK was associated with significant postoperative pain, an initial and temporary myopic overshoot peaking at 1 month, and stability not occurring before 6 months. LASIK was less painful and was associated with more rapid stability (at 1 month) and a trend toward better uncorrected visual acuity, although not statistically significant.

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