Exercise training improves lipoprotein lipid profiles in patients with coronary artery disease

Gregory Heath, Ali A. Ehsani, James M. Hagberg, Judith M. Hinderliter, Andrew P. Goldberg

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

The effects of endurance exercise training on plasma lipoprotein lipids were determined in 10 men, ages 46 to 62 years, with coronary artery disease (CAD). Patients maintained body weight, health-related behaviors, and stable diets throughout the program. Training was at 50% to 85% of maximal oxygen consumption (V̇O2 max) for 40 to 60 minutes, 3 to 5 days/week for 29 ± 7 weeks. Training increased V̇O2 max (31 ± 19%, p < 0.001), reduced plasma cholesterol (C) (-8 ± 4%, p < 0.01), low-density lipoprotein-C (LDL-C) (-9 ± 9%, p < 0.01), and triglyceride (TG) (-13 ± 32%, p < 0.05) concentrations, and increased high-density lipoprotein-C (HDL-C) levels (11 ± 13%, p < 0.05) and HDL-C LDL-C ratios (25 ± 20%, p < 0.01). Changes in LDL-C and V̇O2 max were correlated (r = -0.73, p ± 0.01), while the changes in LDL-C and HDL-C each correlated inversely with pretraining lipoprotein levels (rLDL-C = -0.77, p < 0.01; rHDL-C = -0.68, p < 0.05). Thus potentially "antiatherogenic" benefits of exercise seem to be due to a training effect, since they correlate best with changes in V̇O2 max and are maximal in patients with initially low V̇O2 max, high LDL-C, and low HDL-C levels.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)889-895
Number of pages7
JournalAmerican Heart Journal
Volume105
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1983

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LDL Lipoproteins
Lipoproteins
HDL Lipoproteins
Coronary Artery Disease
Exercise
Lipids
Oxygen Consumption
Triglycerides
Cholesterol
Body Weight
Diet
Health

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Exercise training improves lipoprotein lipid profiles in patients with coronary artery disease. / Heath, Gregory; Ehsani, Ali A.; Hagberg, James M.; Hinderliter, Judith M.; Goldberg, Andrew P.

In: American Heart Journal, Vol. 105, No. 6, 01.01.1983, p. 889-895.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Heath, Gregory ; Ehsani, Ali A. ; Hagberg, James M. ; Hinderliter, Judith M. ; Goldberg, Andrew P. / Exercise training improves lipoprotein lipid profiles in patients with coronary artery disease. In: American Heart Journal. 1983 ; Vol. 105, No. 6. pp. 889-895.
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