Exogenous Pro-Angiogenic Stimuli Cannot Prevent Physiologic Vessel Regression

Ankush Gosain, Annette M. Matthies, Julia V. Dovi, Adrian Barbul, Richard L. Gamelli, Luisa A. DiPietro

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: In healing wounds, rising levels of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) induce a period of robust angiogenesis. The levels of pro-angiogenic factors in the wound begin to decline just before a period of vascular regression, suggesting that these mediators are necessary to sustain vessel density. The purpose of this study was to determine if the maintenance of pro-angiogenic stimuli in the wound would prevent physiological vessel regression. Materials and methods: A standard subcutaneous sponge wound model was modified by the addition of a mini-osmotic pump, allowing manipulation of the wound milieu by the addition of exogenous growth factors. After initial characterization of this model, exogenous VEGF (10 μg/mL), FGF (10 μg/mL), PDGF (10 μg/mL), or VEGF (10 μg/mL) plus FGF (10 μg/mL) were delivered to wounds and blood vessel density analyzed by immunohistochemistry. Results: VEGF administration resulted in a transient increase in wound vessel density (P < 0.05). None of the pro-angiogenic growth factors (VEGF, FGF, PDGF, VEGF/FGF) were able to prevent vascular regression (P = NS). Conclusions: These findings suggest that the anti-angiogenic signals that mediate physiological vascular regression in wounds are strongly dominant over pro-angiogenic stimuli during the later phases of wound healing. Clinical manipulation of anti-angiogenic signals in addition to the currently used pro-angiogenic targets may be needed to achieve therapeutic modulation of blood vessel density.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)218-225
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Surgical Research
Volume135
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2006
Externally publishedYes

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Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor A
Blood Vessels
Wounds and Injuries
Angiogenesis Inducing Agents
Wound Healing
Intercellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins
Porifera
Immunohistochemistry
Maintenance
Therapeutics

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Surgery

Cite this

Gosain, A., Matthies, A. M., Dovi, J. V., Barbul, A., Gamelli, R. L., & DiPietro, L. A. (2006). Exogenous Pro-Angiogenic Stimuli Cannot Prevent Physiologic Vessel Regression. Journal of Surgical Research, 135(2), 218-225. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jss.2006.04.006

Exogenous Pro-Angiogenic Stimuli Cannot Prevent Physiologic Vessel Regression. / Gosain, Ankush; Matthies, Annette M.; Dovi, Julia V.; Barbul, Adrian; Gamelli, Richard L.; DiPietro, Luisa A.

In: Journal of Surgical Research, Vol. 135, No. 2, 01.10.2006, p. 218-225.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Gosain, A, Matthies, AM, Dovi, JV, Barbul, A, Gamelli, RL & DiPietro, LA 2006, 'Exogenous Pro-Angiogenic Stimuli Cannot Prevent Physiologic Vessel Regression', Journal of Surgical Research, vol. 135, no. 2, pp. 218-225. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jss.2006.04.006
Gosain, Ankush ; Matthies, Annette M. ; Dovi, Julia V. ; Barbul, Adrian ; Gamelli, Richard L. ; DiPietro, Luisa A. / Exogenous Pro-Angiogenic Stimuli Cannot Prevent Physiologic Vessel Regression. In: Journal of Surgical Research. 2006 ; Vol. 135, No. 2. pp. 218-225.
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