Experience with vascular control before excision of giant, highly vascular sacrococcygeal teratomas in neonates

Carlos Angel, Carlos Murillo, James Mayhew

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

20 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Sacrococcygeal teratomas (SCT) are the most common neoplasms in newborns with a reported occurrence of 1 in 35,000 live births. Highly vascularized tumors in which the ratio of tumor weight to patient weight approaches 1:1 are frequently associated with hyperdynamic states, prenatal hydrops, placentamegaly, postnatal high-output cardiac failure, and carry a high perinatal mortality rate. Operative management of giant, highly-vascular sacrococcygeal teratomas in neonates can be complicated by life-threatening hemorrhage. Laparotomy, control of the aorta, and the arterial blood supply to these tumors before resection has been advocated as a safer alternative. The authors report their experience with three infants successfully treated using this approach. Hemodynamic stability was maintained during the operations. All tumors were resected successfully. The patients are alive without evidence of recurrence, 8.5 months to 18 months (average, 14.3 months) after the operation. Alpha-fetoprotein levels dropped to normal range after the removal of SCT and have remained normal in follow-up. Vascular control before excision of giant, highly-vascular SCT in neonates is safe, decreases intraoperative blood loss, and postoperative morbidity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1840-1842
Number of pages3
JournalJournal of Pediatric Surgery
Volume33
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1998
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Teratoma
Blood Vessels
Newborn Infant
Neoplasms
Postoperative Hemorrhage
Perinatal Mortality
alpha-Fetoproteins
Live Birth
Tumor Burden
Laparotomy
Aorta
Edema
Reference Values
Heart Failure
Hemodynamics
Hemorrhage
Morbidity
Weights and Measures
Recurrence
Mortality

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Surgery
  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Experience with vascular control before excision of giant, highly vascular sacrococcygeal teratomas in neonates. / Angel, Carlos; Murillo, Carlos; Mayhew, James.

In: Journal of Pediatric Surgery, Vol. 33, No. 12, 01.01.1998, p. 1840-1842.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{f017b7287364401eb6cfdbd01e8fb9ca,
title = "Experience with vascular control before excision of giant, highly vascular sacrococcygeal teratomas in neonates",
abstract = "Sacrococcygeal teratomas (SCT) are the most common neoplasms in newborns with a reported occurrence of 1 in 35,000 live births. Highly vascularized tumors in which the ratio of tumor weight to patient weight approaches 1:1 are frequently associated with hyperdynamic states, prenatal hydrops, placentamegaly, postnatal high-output cardiac failure, and carry a high perinatal mortality rate. Operative management of giant, highly-vascular sacrococcygeal teratomas in neonates can be complicated by life-threatening hemorrhage. Laparotomy, control of the aorta, and the arterial blood supply to these tumors before resection has been advocated as a safer alternative. The authors report their experience with three infants successfully treated using this approach. Hemodynamic stability was maintained during the operations. All tumors were resected successfully. The patients are alive without evidence of recurrence, 8.5 months to 18 months (average, 14.3 months) after the operation. Alpha-fetoprotein levels dropped to normal range after the removal of SCT and have remained normal in follow-up. Vascular control before excision of giant, highly-vascular SCT in neonates is safe, decreases intraoperative blood loss, and postoperative morbidity.",
author = "Carlos Angel and Carlos Murillo and James Mayhew",
year = "1998",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/S0022-3468(98)90302-5",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "33",
pages = "1840--1842",
journal = "Journal of Pediatric Surgery",
issn = "0022-3468",
publisher = "W.B. Saunders Ltd",
number = "12",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Experience with vascular control before excision of giant, highly vascular sacrococcygeal teratomas in neonates

AU - Angel, Carlos

AU - Murillo, Carlos

AU - Mayhew, James

PY - 1998/1/1

Y1 - 1998/1/1

N2 - Sacrococcygeal teratomas (SCT) are the most common neoplasms in newborns with a reported occurrence of 1 in 35,000 live births. Highly vascularized tumors in which the ratio of tumor weight to patient weight approaches 1:1 are frequently associated with hyperdynamic states, prenatal hydrops, placentamegaly, postnatal high-output cardiac failure, and carry a high perinatal mortality rate. Operative management of giant, highly-vascular sacrococcygeal teratomas in neonates can be complicated by life-threatening hemorrhage. Laparotomy, control of the aorta, and the arterial blood supply to these tumors before resection has been advocated as a safer alternative. The authors report their experience with three infants successfully treated using this approach. Hemodynamic stability was maintained during the operations. All tumors were resected successfully. The patients are alive without evidence of recurrence, 8.5 months to 18 months (average, 14.3 months) after the operation. Alpha-fetoprotein levels dropped to normal range after the removal of SCT and have remained normal in follow-up. Vascular control before excision of giant, highly-vascular SCT in neonates is safe, decreases intraoperative blood loss, and postoperative morbidity.

AB - Sacrococcygeal teratomas (SCT) are the most common neoplasms in newborns with a reported occurrence of 1 in 35,000 live births. Highly vascularized tumors in which the ratio of tumor weight to patient weight approaches 1:1 are frequently associated with hyperdynamic states, prenatal hydrops, placentamegaly, postnatal high-output cardiac failure, and carry a high perinatal mortality rate. Operative management of giant, highly-vascular sacrococcygeal teratomas in neonates can be complicated by life-threatening hemorrhage. Laparotomy, control of the aorta, and the arterial blood supply to these tumors before resection has been advocated as a safer alternative. The authors report their experience with three infants successfully treated using this approach. Hemodynamic stability was maintained during the operations. All tumors were resected successfully. The patients are alive without evidence of recurrence, 8.5 months to 18 months (average, 14.3 months) after the operation. Alpha-fetoprotein levels dropped to normal range after the removal of SCT and have remained normal in follow-up. Vascular control before excision of giant, highly-vascular SCT in neonates is safe, decreases intraoperative blood loss, and postoperative morbidity.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0031673817&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0031673817&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/S0022-3468(98)90302-5

DO - 10.1016/S0022-3468(98)90302-5

M3 - Article

VL - 33

SP - 1840

EP - 1842

JO - Journal of Pediatric Surgery

JF - Journal of Pediatric Surgery

SN - 0022-3468

IS - 12

ER -