Experimentally induced upper facial third fractures in unembalmed human cadaver heads

John Hudson, Robert M. Russell, David Gerard, H. Preston Lake

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Considerable need exists in the transportation industry to develop safety guidelines to protect the head and neck. One of the goals of this study was to produce facial fractures similar to those induced in motor vehicle crashes. Unembalmed cadaver heads were fixed to a supporting device and impacted with a steel pipe. The must common fracture was of the frontal sinus; multiple orbital wall, naso-orbitoethmoid, Le Fort I, II, and III fractures were also produced. Average impact speeds of 7.2 meters per second striking at the supraorbital rims created severe injury to both skull and contents. Energy absorption values accounted for the actual total contact time between head and pipe with tolerance level values measuring the force at specific intervals. The method described may be used to reproduce reliably those forces resulting in the facial fractures seen in the emergency room setting after motor vehicle crashes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)705-710
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Trauma - Injury, Infection and Critical Care
Volume42
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1997

Fingerprint

Cadaver
Head
Motor Vehicles
Frontal Sinus
Steel
Skull
Hospital Emergency Service
Industry
Neck
Guidelines
Safety
Equipment and Supplies
Wounds and Injuries

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Surgery
  • Critical Care and Intensive Care Medicine

Cite this

Experimentally induced upper facial third fractures in unembalmed human cadaver heads. / Hudson, John; Russell, Robert M.; Gerard, David; Preston Lake, H.

In: Journal of Trauma - Injury, Infection and Critical Care, Vol. 42, No. 4, 01.01.1997, p. 705-710.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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