Exploration of preterm birth rates using the public health exposome database and computational analysis methods

Anne D. Kershenbaum, Michael A. Langston, Robert S. Levine, Arnold M. Saxton, Tonny Oyana, Barbara J. Kilbourne, Gary L. Rogers, Lisaann S. Gittner, Suzanne H. Baktash, Patricia Matthews-Juarez, Paul D. Juarez

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Recent advances in informatics technology has made it possible to integrate, manipulate, and analyze variables from a wide range of scientific disciplines allowing for the examination of complex social problems such as health disparities. This study used 589 county-level variables to identify and compare geographical variation of high and low preterm birth rates. Data were collected from a number of publically available sources, bringing together natality outcomes with attributes of the natural, built, social, and policy environments. Singleton early premature county birth rate, in counties with population size over 100,000 persons provided the dependent variable. Graph theoretical techniques were used to identify a wide range of predictor variables from various domains, including black proportion, obesity and diabetes, sexually transmitted infection rates, mother’s age, income, marriage rates, pollution and temperature among others. Dense subgraphs (paracliques) representing groups of highly correlated variables were resolved into latent factors, which were then used to build a regression model explaining prematurity (R-squared = 76.7%). Two lists of counties with large positive and large negative residuals, indicating unusual prematurity rates given their circumstances, may serve as a starting point for ways to intervene and reduce health disparities for preterm births.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)12346-12366
Number of pages21
JournalInternational journal of environmental research and public health
Volume11
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 28 2014

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Birth Rate
Premature Birth
Public Health
Databases
Psychological Techniques
Informatics
Social Environment
Social Problems
Health
Public Policy
Sexually Transmitted Diseases
Population Density
Marriage
Obesity
Mothers
Technology
Temperature

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Health, Toxicology and Mutagenesis

Cite this

Kershenbaum, A. D., Langston, M. A., Levine, R. S., Saxton, A. M., Oyana, T., Kilbourne, B. J., ... Juarez, P. D. (2014). Exploration of preterm birth rates using the public health exposome database and computational analysis methods. International journal of environmental research and public health, 11(12), 12346-12366. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph111212346

Exploration of preterm birth rates using the public health exposome database and computational analysis methods. / Kershenbaum, Anne D.; Langston, Michael A.; Levine, Robert S.; Saxton, Arnold M.; Oyana, Tonny; Kilbourne, Barbara J.; Rogers, Gary L.; Gittner, Lisaann S.; Baktash, Suzanne H.; Matthews-Juarez, Patricia; Juarez, Paul D.

In: International journal of environmental research and public health, Vol. 11, No. 12, 28.11.2014, p. 12346-12366.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kershenbaum, AD, Langston, MA, Levine, RS, Saxton, AM, Oyana, T, Kilbourne, BJ, Rogers, GL, Gittner, LS, Baktash, SH, Matthews-Juarez, P & Juarez, PD 2014, 'Exploration of preterm birth rates using the public health exposome database and computational analysis methods', International journal of environmental research and public health, vol. 11, no. 12, pp. 12346-12366. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph111212346
Kershenbaum, Anne D. ; Langston, Michael A. ; Levine, Robert S. ; Saxton, Arnold M. ; Oyana, Tonny ; Kilbourne, Barbara J. ; Rogers, Gary L. ; Gittner, Lisaann S. ; Baktash, Suzanne H. ; Matthews-Juarez, Patricia ; Juarez, Paul D. / Exploration of preterm birth rates using the public health exposome database and computational analysis methods. In: International journal of environmental research and public health. 2014 ; Vol. 11, No. 12. pp. 12346-12366.
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