Exploratory analysis of estimated acoustic peak rarefaction pressure, recanalization, and outcome in the transcranial ultrasound in clinical sonothrombolysis trial

Kristian Barlinn, Georgios Tsivgoulis, Carlos A. Molina, Dmitri A. Alexandrov, Mark E. Schafer, John Alleman, Andrei Alexandrov

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Abstract

Purpose: Acoustic peak rarefaction pressure (APRP) is the main factor that influences ultrasound-enhanced thrombolysis. We sought to determine whether recanalization rate and functional outcomes in the Transcranial Ultrasound in Clinical SONothrombolysis (TUCSON) trial could be predicted by estimated in vivo APRP. Methods: We developed an acoustic attenuation model to estimate the in vivo APRP at the arterial occlusion site in each subject of the TUCSON trial with CT scans eligible for measurements. Variables included temporal bone thickness, depth of arterial occlusion site, and average attenuation of skin and brain tissues. Recanalization was defined as partial or complete using the Thrombolysis in Brain Infarction flow grades. Functional independence was assessed at 3 months using the modified Rankin Scale score (mRS, 0-1). Results: APRP was calculated in 20 acute ischemic stroke patients treated with sonothrombolysis (mean age, 64 ± 15 years, 65% men; median NIHSS score, 13; IQR, 6-17). The mean APRP was 30.2 ± 15.5 kPa (range, 8-68 kPa). Patients with persisting occlusion had nonsignificantly lower APRP than patients with partial or complete recanalization (25.2 ± 8.0 versus 32.3 ± 17.7 kPa; p = 0.228). Patients who were functionally independent at 3 months had nonsignificantly higher APRP than patients with worse outcome (35.1 ± 19.5 versus 25.9 ± 11.2 kPa; p = 0.217). Conclusions: Our exploratory analysis suggests a potentially important role of successful energy delivery to augment thrombolysis with 2-MHz ultrasound in acute ischemic stroke patients.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)354-360
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Clinical Ultrasound
Volume41
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2013

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Acoustics
Clinical Trials
Pressure
Stroke
Brain Infarction
Temporal Bone
Arterial Pressure
Skin
Brain

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging

Cite this

Exploratory analysis of estimated acoustic peak rarefaction pressure, recanalization, and outcome in the transcranial ultrasound in clinical sonothrombolysis trial. / Barlinn, Kristian; Tsivgoulis, Georgios; Molina, Carlos A.; Alexandrov, Dmitri A.; Schafer, Mark E.; Alleman, John; Alexandrov, Andrei.

In: Journal of Clinical Ultrasound, Vol. 41, No. 6, 01.07.2013, p. 354-360.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Molina, Carlos A.

AU - Alexandrov, Dmitri A.

AU - Schafer, Mark E.

AU - Alleman, John

AU - Alexandrov, Andrei

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N2 - Purpose: Acoustic peak rarefaction pressure (APRP) is the main factor that influences ultrasound-enhanced thrombolysis. We sought to determine whether recanalization rate and functional outcomes in the Transcranial Ultrasound in Clinical SONothrombolysis (TUCSON) trial could be predicted by estimated in vivo APRP. Methods: We developed an acoustic attenuation model to estimate the in vivo APRP at the arterial occlusion site in each subject of the TUCSON trial with CT scans eligible for measurements. Variables included temporal bone thickness, depth of arterial occlusion site, and average attenuation of skin and brain tissues. Recanalization was defined as partial or complete using the Thrombolysis in Brain Infarction flow grades. Functional independence was assessed at 3 months using the modified Rankin Scale score (mRS, 0-1). Results: APRP was calculated in 20 acute ischemic stroke patients treated with sonothrombolysis (mean age, 64 ± 15 years, 65% men; median NIHSS score, 13; IQR, 6-17). The mean APRP was 30.2 ± 15.5 kPa (range, 8-68 kPa). Patients with persisting occlusion had nonsignificantly lower APRP than patients with partial or complete recanalization (25.2 ± 8.0 versus 32.3 ± 17.7 kPa; p = 0.228). Patients who were functionally independent at 3 months had nonsignificantly higher APRP than patients with worse outcome (35.1 ± 19.5 versus 25.9 ± 11.2 kPa; p = 0.217). Conclusions: Our exploratory analysis suggests a potentially important role of successful energy delivery to augment thrombolysis with 2-MHz ultrasound in acute ischemic stroke patients.

AB - Purpose: Acoustic peak rarefaction pressure (APRP) is the main factor that influences ultrasound-enhanced thrombolysis. We sought to determine whether recanalization rate and functional outcomes in the Transcranial Ultrasound in Clinical SONothrombolysis (TUCSON) trial could be predicted by estimated in vivo APRP. Methods: We developed an acoustic attenuation model to estimate the in vivo APRP at the arterial occlusion site in each subject of the TUCSON trial with CT scans eligible for measurements. Variables included temporal bone thickness, depth of arterial occlusion site, and average attenuation of skin and brain tissues. Recanalization was defined as partial or complete using the Thrombolysis in Brain Infarction flow grades. Functional independence was assessed at 3 months using the modified Rankin Scale score (mRS, 0-1). Results: APRP was calculated in 20 acute ischemic stroke patients treated with sonothrombolysis (mean age, 64 ± 15 years, 65% men; median NIHSS score, 13; IQR, 6-17). The mean APRP was 30.2 ± 15.5 kPa (range, 8-68 kPa). Patients with persisting occlusion had nonsignificantly lower APRP than patients with partial or complete recanalization (25.2 ± 8.0 versus 32.3 ± 17.7 kPa; p = 0.228). Patients who were functionally independent at 3 months had nonsignificantly higher APRP than patients with worse outcome (35.1 ± 19.5 versus 25.9 ± 11.2 kPa; p = 0.217). Conclusions: Our exploratory analysis suggests a potentially important role of successful energy delivery to augment thrombolysis with 2-MHz ultrasound in acute ischemic stroke patients.

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