Exploring the Experience of Type 2 Diabetes in Urban Aboriginal People

David Gregory, Wendy Whalley, Judith Olson, Marilyn Bain, G. Grace Harper, Leslie Roberts, Cynthia Russell

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    14 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    The experience of diabetes among urban Aboriginal people (status and non-status Indians) was explored through a qualitative study. Because researchers have focused almost exclusively on Aboriginal people living on reserves or in isolated rural communities in Canada, this study conducted face-to-face interviews with participants (n = 20) living in the city of Winnipeg, Manitoba. The data generated 3 themes: diabetes as an omnipresent and uncontrollable disease; beyond high sugar: diabetes revealed in bodily damage; and the good, the bad, and the unhelpful: interactions with health-care providers. Findings from this study and previous research support the existence of a pan- Aboriginal model of diabetes. This contemporary cultural stance appears to transcend geography and has implications for the prevention and treatment approaches used in programs and health services for Aboriginal people living with diabetes.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)101-115
    Number of pages15
    JournalCanadian Journal of Nursing Research
    Volume31
    Issue number1
    StatePublished - Dec 1 1999

    Fingerprint

    Manitoba
    Geography
    Rural Population
    Health Personnel
    Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus
    Health Services
    Canada
    Research Personnel
    Interviews
    Therapeutics
    Transcend

    All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

    • Medicine(all)

    Cite this

    Gregory, D., Whalley, W., Olson, J., Bain, M., Harper, G. G., Roberts, L., & Russell, C. (1999). Exploring the Experience of Type 2 Diabetes in Urban Aboriginal People. Canadian Journal of Nursing Research, 31(1), 101-115.

    Exploring the Experience of Type 2 Diabetes in Urban Aboriginal People. / Gregory, David; Whalley, Wendy; Olson, Judith; Bain, Marilyn; Harper, G. Grace; Roberts, Leslie; Russell, Cynthia.

    In: Canadian Journal of Nursing Research, Vol. 31, No. 1, 01.12.1999, p. 101-115.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Gregory, D, Whalley, W, Olson, J, Bain, M, Harper, GG, Roberts, L & Russell, C 1999, 'Exploring the Experience of Type 2 Diabetes in Urban Aboriginal People', Canadian Journal of Nursing Research, vol. 31, no. 1, pp. 101-115.
    Gregory D, Whalley W, Olson J, Bain M, Harper GG, Roberts L et al. Exploring the Experience of Type 2 Diabetes in Urban Aboriginal People. Canadian Journal of Nursing Research. 1999 Dec 1;31(1):101-115.
    Gregory, David ; Whalley, Wendy ; Olson, Judith ; Bain, Marilyn ; Harper, G. Grace ; Roberts, Leslie ; Russell, Cynthia. / Exploring the Experience of Type 2 Diabetes in Urban Aboriginal People. In: Canadian Journal of Nursing Research. 1999 ; Vol. 31, No. 1. pp. 101-115.
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