Exposure to Deepwater Horizon Crude Oil Burnoff Particulate Matter Induces Pulmonary Inflammation and Alters Adaptive Immune Response

Sridhar Jaligama, Zaili Chen, Jordy Saravia, Nikki Yadav, Slawomir M. Lomnicki, Tammy R. Dugas, Stephania Cormier

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

The "in situ burning" of trapped crude oil on the surface of Gulf waters during the 2010 Deepwater Horizon (DWH) oil spill released numerous pollutants, including combustion-generated particulate matter (PM). Limited information is available on the respiratory impact of inhaled in situ burned oil sail particulate matter (OSPM). Here we utilized PM collected from in situ burn plumes of the DWH oil spill to study the acute effects of exposure to OSPM on pulmonary health. OSPM caused dose-and time-dependent cytotoxicity and generated reactive oxygen species and superoxide radicals in vitro. Additionally, mice exposed to OSPM exhibited significant decreases in body weight gain, systemic oxidative stress in the form of increased serum 8-isoprostane (8-IP) levels, and airway inflammation in the form of increased macrophages and eosinophils in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Further, in a mouse model of allergic asthma, OSPM caused increased T helper 2 cells (Th2), peribronchiolar inflammation, and increased airway mucus production. These findings demonstrate that acute exposure to OSPM results in pulmonary inflammation and alteration of innate/adaptive immune responses in mice and highlight potential respiratory effects associated with cleaning up an oil spill. (Figure Presented).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)8769-8776
Number of pages8
JournalEnvironmental Science and Technology
Volume49
Issue number14
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 21 2015

Fingerprint

Particulate Matter
Petroleum
immune response
ice ridge
crude oil
particulate matter
Oils
oil
Oil spills
oil spill
8-epi-prostaglandin F2alpha
Oxidative stress
exposure
Macrophages
asthma
mucus
Cytotoxicity
Superoxides
serum
Cleaning

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Chemistry(all)
  • Environmental Chemistry

Cite this

Exposure to Deepwater Horizon Crude Oil Burnoff Particulate Matter Induces Pulmonary Inflammation and Alters Adaptive Immune Response. / Jaligama, Sridhar; Chen, Zaili; Saravia, Jordy; Yadav, Nikki; Lomnicki, Slawomir M.; Dugas, Tammy R.; Cormier, Stephania.

In: Environmental Science and Technology, Vol. 49, No. 14, 21.07.2015, p. 8769-8776.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Jaligama, Sridhar ; Chen, Zaili ; Saravia, Jordy ; Yadav, Nikki ; Lomnicki, Slawomir M. ; Dugas, Tammy R. ; Cormier, Stephania. / Exposure to Deepwater Horizon Crude Oil Burnoff Particulate Matter Induces Pulmonary Inflammation and Alters Adaptive Immune Response. In: Environmental Science and Technology. 2015 ; Vol. 49, No. 14. pp. 8769-8776.
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