Expression of anti-DNA immunoglobulin transgenes in non-autoimmune mice

Jan Erikson, Marko Radic, Sally A. Camper, Richard R. Hardy, Condie Carmack, Martin Weigert

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

420 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Self-reactive B cells can be regulated by either deletion or inactivation1. These manifestations of self-tolerance have been dramatically shown in transgenic mice in which the number of self-reactive cells has been artificially expanded2,3. We have now extended these models to ask if B-cell tolerance as described for non-disease-associated antigens also operates for the targets of autoimmunity. The target we have chosen is DNA. Anti-DNA antibodies are diagnostic of certain autoimmune syndromes in humans and are a characteristic of the murine model of systemic autoimmunity, the MRI/ipr mouse4. Antibodies to both single-stranded and double-stranded DNA have been implicated in disease5,6. By generating anti-DNA transgenic mice, we have addressed the question of whether DNA-specific B cells are regulated in normal (non-autoimmune) mice. We indeed found that most transgenic B cells bind DNA, yet we failed to detect secreted anti-DNA. We suggest that as a consequence of their self-reactivity these B cells are developmentally arrested.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)331-334
Number of pages4
JournalNature
Volume349
Issue number6307
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1991

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Transgenes
Immunoglobulins
B-Lymphocytes
DNA
Autoimmunity
Transgenic Mice
Self Tolerance
Antinuclear Antibodies
Antigens
Antibodies

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • General

Cite this

Erikson, J., Radic, M., Camper, S. A., Hardy, R. R., Carmack, C., & Weigert, M. (1991). Expression of anti-DNA immunoglobulin transgenes in non-autoimmune mice. Nature, 349(6307), 331-334. https://doi.org/10.1038/349331a0

Expression of anti-DNA immunoglobulin transgenes in non-autoimmune mice. / Erikson, Jan; Radic, Marko; Camper, Sally A.; Hardy, Richard R.; Carmack, Condie; Weigert, Martin.

In: Nature, Vol. 349, No. 6307, 01.01.1991, p. 331-334.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Erikson, J, Radic, M, Camper, SA, Hardy, RR, Carmack, C & Weigert, M 1991, 'Expression of anti-DNA immunoglobulin transgenes in non-autoimmune mice', Nature, vol. 349, no. 6307, pp. 331-334. https://doi.org/10.1038/349331a0
Erikson J, Radic M, Camper SA, Hardy RR, Carmack C, Weigert M. Expression of anti-DNA immunoglobulin transgenes in non-autoimmune mice. Nature. 1991 Jan 1;349(6307):331-334. https://doi.org/10.1038/349331a0
Erikson, Jan ; Radic, Marko ; Camper, Sally A. ; Hardy, Richard R. ; Carmack, Condie ; Weigert, Martin. / Expression of anti-DNA immunoglobulin transgenes in non-autoimmune mice. In: Nature. 1991 ; Vol. 349, No. 6307. pp. 331-334.
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