Extracorporeal shock wave treatment of non-or delayed union of proximal metatarsal fractures

Richard Alvarez, Brandon Cincere, Chandra Channappa, Richard Langerman, Robert Schulte, Juha Jaakkola, Keith Melancon, Michael Shereff, G. Lee Cross

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

21 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Nonunion or delayed union of fractures in the proximal aspect of metatarsals 1 to 4 and Zone 2 of the fifth metatarsal were treated by high energy extracorporeal shock wave treatment (ESWT) to study the safety and efficacy of this method of treatment in a FDA study of the Ossatron device. Materials and Methods: In a prospective single-arm, multi-center study, 34 fractures were treated in 32 patients (two subjects had two independent fractures) with ESWT. All fractures were at least 10 (range, 10 to 833) weeks after injury, with a median of 23 weeks. ESWT application was conducted using a protocol totaling 2,000 shocks for a total energy application of approximately 0.22 to 0.51 mJ/mm2 per treatment. The mean ESWT application time for each of the treatments was 24.6 ± 16.6 minutes, and anesthesia time averaged 27.1 ± 10.4 minutes. All subjects were followed for 1 year after treatment at intervals of 12 weeks, 6, 9, and 12 months. Results: The overall success rate at the 12-week visit was 71% with low complications, significant pain improvement as well as improvement on the SF-36. The success/fail criteria was evaluated again at the 6-and 12-month followup, showing treatment success rates of 89% (23/26) and 90% (18/20), respectively. The most common adverse event was swelling in the foot, reported by five subjects (15.6%). Conclusion: Highenergy ESWT appears to be effective and safe in patients for treatment of nonunion or a delayed healing of a proximal metatarsal, and in fifth metatarsal fractures in Zone 2.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)746-754
Number of pages9
JournalFoot and Ankle International
Volume32
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2011

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Metatarsal Bones
Shock
Therapeutics
High-Energy Shock Waves
Foot
Anesthesia
Safety
Pain
Equipment and Supplies

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Surgery
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

Cite this

Alvarez, R., Cincere, B., Channappa, C., Langerman, R., Schulte, R., Jaakkola, J., ... Cross, G. L. (2011). Extracorporeal shock wave treatment of non-or delayed union of proximal metatarsal fractures. Foot and Ankle International, 32(8), 746-754. https://doi.org/10.3113/FAI.2011.0746

Extracorporeal shock wave treatment of non-or delayed union of proximal metatarsal fractures. / Alvarez, Richard; Cincere, Brandon; Channappa, Chandra; Langerman, Richard; Schulte, Robert; Jaakkola, Juha; Melancon, Keith; Shereff, Michael; Cross, G. Lee.

In: Foot and Ankle International, Vol. 32, No. 8, 01.08.2011, p. 746-754.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Alvarez, R, Cincere, B, Channappa, C, Langerman, R, Schulte, R, Jaakkola, J, Melancon, K, Shereff, M & Cross, GL 2011, 'Extracorporeal shock wave treatment of non-or delayed union of proximal metatarsal fractures', Foot and Ankle International, vol. 32, no. 8, pp. 746-754. https://doi.org/10.3113/FAI.2011.0746
Alvarez, Richard ; Cincere, Brandon ; Channappa, Chandra ; Langerman, Richard ; Schulte, Robert ; Jaakkola, Juha ; Melancon, Keith ; Shereff, Michael ; Cross, G. Lee. / Extracorporeal shock wave treatment of non-or delayed union of proximal metatarsal fractures. In: Foot and Ankle International. 2011 ; Vol. 32, No. 8. pp. 746-754.
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AU - Jaakkola, Juha

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AU - Shereff, Michael

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