Factors causing interrupted delivery of enteral nutrition in trauma intensive care unit patients

Laurie M. Morgan, Roland Dickerson, Kathryn H. Alexander, Rex O. Brown, Gayle Minard

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

30 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: The intent of this study was to ascertain the adequacy of delivery of enteral nutrition (EN) to critically ill adult multiple trauma patients and to identify potential detrimental factors that affect EN delivery. Methods: Retrospective observational study. Trauma intensive care unit (TICU) in a university-affiliated hospital. Adult patients (≥18 years of age) admitted to the TICU who received enteral feeding. Results: Fifty-six adult patients were enrolled for study. Patients received, on average, 67% ± 19% of what was prescribed for 5.7 ± 2.0 days. A total of 222 occurrences for temporary discontinuation of tube feeding were identified. Gastrointestinal intolerance, as defined by a gastric residual volume of >150 mL, abdominal pain, or >3 liquid stools per day, accounted for only 11% of the occurrences for discontinuation of feeding. Surgery (27%) and diagnostic procedures (15%) represented the majority of reasons for inadequate nutrient delivery. Minor factors for EN interruptions were mechanical feeding tube problems (8%), pharmacy delivery delay (4%), and miscellaneous factors (3%). Multiple and unknown reasons contributed to 14% and 18% of the occurrences, respectively. Conclusions: Surgery and diagnostic procedures accounted for the largest factor in enteral feeding discontinuations in our critically ill trauma patients. Gastrointestinal intolerance contributed a minor role in the temporary discontinuation of enteral feeding.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)511-517
Number of pages7
JournalNutrition in Clinical Practice
Volume19
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2004

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Enteral Nutrition
Intensive Care Units
Wounds and Injuries
Critical Illness
Residual Volume
Multiple Trauma
Abdominal Pain
Observational Studies
Stomach
Retrospective Studies
Food

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

Cite this

Factors causing interrupted delivery of enteral nutrition in trauma intensive care unit patients. / Morgan, Laurie M.; Dickerson, Roland; Alexander, Kathryn H.; Brown, Rex O.; Minard, Gayle.

In: Nutrition in Clinical Practice, Vol. 19, No. 5, 01.01.2004, p. 511-517.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Morgan, Laurie M. ; Dickerson, Roland ; Alexander, Kathryn H. ; Brown, Rex O. ; Minard, Gayle. / Factors causing interrupted delivery of enteral nutrition in trauma intensive care unit patients. In: Nutrition in Clinical Practice. 2004 ; Vol. 19, No. 5. pp. 511-517.
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