False Evidence of Carotid Stenosis on Magnetic Resonance Angiography Caused by Surgical Clips

Tulio Bertorini, Robert Laster

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Patients with transient ischemic attacks are increasingly studied with magnetic resonance angiography, allowing noninvasive evaluation of both the intracranial and the extracranial vessels. Described here are 3 patients who after endarterectomies presented with transient ischemic attacks and in whom magnetic resonance ang1ography with a two-dimensional time-of-flight pulse sequence showed a false-positive artenal stenosis, as documented by transfemoral carotid angiography. The pseudostenosis was believed to be artifactually caused by operative clips. Results of magnetic resonance angiography should be interpreted with caution in patients with previous neck surgery.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)206-208
Number of pages3
JournalJournal of Neuroimaging
Volume5
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 1995

Fingerprint

Magnetic Resonance Angiography
Carotid Stenosis
Surgical Instruments
Transient Ischemic Attack
Endarterectomy
Angiography
Pathologic Constriction
Neck
Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Radiological and Ultrasound Technology

Cite this

False Evidence of Carotid Stenosis on Magnetic Resonance Angiography Caused by Surgical Clips. / Bertorini, Tulio; Laster, Robert.

In: Journal of Neuroimaging, Vol. 5, No. 4, 1995, p. 206-208.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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