Familial ventricular arrhythmias in boxers.

K. M. Meurs, A. W. Spier, M. W. Miller, L. Lehmkuhl, Jeffrey Towbin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

79 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The purposes of this study were to evaluate families of Boxers with ventricular arrhythmias to determine whether this disorder is a familial trait and, if so, to determine the mode of inheritance. Eighty-two Boxers were evaluated by physical examination, electrocardiogram, echocardiogram, and 24-hour ambulatory electrocardiogram. Dogs were considered affected if at least 50 premature ventricular complexes (PVCs) were observed during a 24-hour period. All dogs were at least 6 years of age at evaluation. Complete cardiovascular examinations were performed on dogs from 6 extended families. The 2 most complete pedigrees were used to determine the pattern of inheritance. The number of PVCs observed during a 24-hour period in affected dogs ranged from 112 to 4,894 (mean +/- SD, median; 1,309 +/- 2,609, 1,017). The number of PVCs observed during a 24-hour period in the unaffected dogs ranged from 0 to 16 (7 +/- 10, 12). Pedigree evaluation was performed to determine pattern of inheritance. An autosomal dominant pattern was determined to be most likely because a sex predisposition was not observed, affected individuals were observed in every generation, and 2 affected individuals produced unaffected offspring. We conclude that familial ventricular arrhythmias is inherited as an autosomal dominant trait in some Boxers.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)437-439
Number of pages3
JournalJournal of veterinary internal medicine / American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine
Volume13
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1999

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Boxer (dog breed)
arrhythmia
Cardiac Arrhythmias
Dogs
Ventricular Premature Complexes
dogs
inheritance (genetics)
Inheritance Patterns
electrocardiography
Pedigree
pedigree
Electrocardiography
extended families
clinical examination
Physical Examination
gender

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • veterinary(all)

Cite this

Familial ventricular arrhythmias in boxers. / Meurs, K. M.; Spier, A. W.; Miller, M. W.; Lehmkuhl, L.; Towbin, Jeffrey.

In: Journal of veterinary internal medicine / American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine, Vol. 13, No. 5, 01.01.1999, p. 437-439.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Meurs, K. M. ; Spier, A. W. ; Miller, M. W. ; Lehmkuhl, L. ; Towbin, Jeffrey. / Familial ventricular arrhythmias in boxers. In: Journal of veterinary internal medicine / American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine. 1999 ; Vol. 13, No. 5. pp. 437-439.
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