Fat-induced membrane cholesterol accrual provokes cortical filamentous actin destabilisation and glucose transport dysfunction in skeletal muscle

K. M. Habegger, B. A. Penque, W. Sealls, L. Tackett, L. N. Bell, E. K. Blue, P. J. Gallagher, M. Sturek, M. A. Alloosh, Helmut Steinberg, R. V. Considine, J. S. Elmendorf

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Aims/hypothesis: Diminished cortical filamentous actin (F-actin) has been implicated in skeletal muscle insulin resistance, yet the mechanism(s) is unknown. Here we tested the hypothesis that changes in membrane cholesterol could be a causative factor, as organised F-actin structure emanates from cholesterol-enriched raft microdomains at the plasma membrane. Methods: Skeletal muscle samples from high-fat-fed animals and insulin-sensitive and insulin-resistant human participants were evaluated. The study also used L6 myotubes to directly determine the impact of fatty acids (FAs) on membrane/cytoskeletal variables and insulin action. Results: High-fat-fed insulin-resistant animals displayed elevated levels of membrane cholesterol and reduced F-actin structure compared with normal chow-fed animals. Moreover, human muscle biopsies revealed an inverse correlation between membrane cholesterol and whole-body glucose disposal. Palmitate-induced insulin-resistant myotubes displayed membrane cholesterol accrual and F-actin loss. Cholesterol lowering protected against the palmitate-induced defects, whereas characteristically measured defects in insulin signalling were not corrected. Conversely, cholesterol loading of L6 myotube membranes provoked a palmitate-like cytoskeletal/GLUT4 derangement. Mechanistically, we observed a palmitate-induced increase in O-linked glycosylation, an end-product of the hexosamine biosynthesis pathway (HBP). Consistent with HBP activity affecting the transcription of various genes, we observed an increase in Hmgcr, a gene that encodes 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl coenzyme A reductase, the rate-limiting enzyme in cholesterol synthesis. In line with increased HBP activity transcriptionally provoking a membrane cholesterol-based insulin-resistant state, HBP inhibition attenuated Hmgcr expression and prevented membrane cholesterol accrual, F-actin loss and GLUT4/glucose transport dysfunction. Conclusions/interpretation: Our results suggest a novel cholesterolgenic-based mechanism of FA-induced membrane/cytoskeletal disorder and insulin resistance.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)457-467
Number of pages11
JournalDiabetologia
Volume55
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2012
Externally publishedYes

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Actins
Skeletal Muscle
Fats
Cholesterol
Glucose
Membranes
Hexosamines
Insulin
Palmitates
Skeletal Muscle Fibers
Insulin Resistance
Fatty Acids
Glycosylation
Genes
Oxidoreductases
Cell Membrane
Biopsy
Muscles
Enzymes

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Internal Medicine
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism

Cite this

Habegger, K. M., Penque, B. A., Sealls, W., Tackett, L., Bell, L. N., Blue, E. K., ... Elmendorf, J. S. (2012). Fat-induced membrane cholesterol accrual provokes cortical filamentous actin destabilisation and glucose transport dysfunction in skeletal muscle. Diabetologia, 55(2), 457-467. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00125-011-2334-y

Fat-induced membrane cholesterol accrual provokes cortical filamentous actin destabilisation and glucose transport dysfunction in skeletal muscle. / Habegger, K. M.; Penque, B. A.; Sealls, W.; Tackett, L.; Bell, L. N.; Blue, E. K.; Gallagher, P. J.; Sturek, M.; Alloosh, M. A.; Steinberg, Helmut; Considine, R. V.; Elmendorf, J. S.

In: Diabetologia, Vol. 55, No. 2, 01.02.2012, p. 457-467.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Habegger, KM, Penque, BA, Sealls, W, Tackett, L, Bell, LN, Blue, EK, Gallagher, PJ, Sturek, M, Alloosh, MA, Steinberg, H, Considine, RV & Elmendorf, JS 2012, 'Fat-induced membrane cholesterol accrual provokes cortical filamentous actin destabilisation and glucose transport dysfunction in skeletal muscle', Diabetologia, vol. 55, no. 2, pp. 457-467. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00125-011-2334-y
Habegger, K. M. ; Penque, B. A. ; Sealls, W. ; Tackett, L. ; Bell, L. N. ; Blue, E. K. ; Gallagher, P. J. ; Sturek, M. ; Alloosh, M. A. ; Steinberg, Helmut ; Considine, R. V. ; Elmendorf, J. S. / Fat-induced membrane cholesterol accrual provokes cortical filamentous actin destabilisation and glucose transport dysfunction in skeletal muscle. In: Diabetologia. 2012 ; Vol. 55, No. 2. pp. 457-467.
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AU - Habegger, K. M.

AU - Penque, B. A.

AU - Sealls, W.

AU - Tackett, L.

AU - Bell, L. N.

AU - Blue, E. K.

AU - Gallagher, P. J.

AU - Sturek, M.

AU - Alloosh, M. A.

AU - Steinberg, Helmut

AU - Considine, R. V.

AU - Elmendorf, J. S.

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