Father-absent adolescents with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus

A population at risk?

Cindy L. Hanson, Scott W. Henggeler, James R. Rodrigue, George A. Burghen, William Murphy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

19 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study evaluated whether family structure is associated with the psychosocial functioning and physical health of adolescents with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM). Subjects were 30 intact families and 30 father-absent families. Adolescents and their mothers completed several self-report and observational instruments that assessed adolescent adherence to treatment, adolescents' and mothers' perceptions of maternal support and nonsupport of treatment, mothers' parental competence, and adolescent social competence. Metabolic control was determined by averaging the adolescent's hemoglobin A1c levels during the previous year. A 2 × 2 (Family Structure × Gender) analysis of variance was conducted on each dependent measure. The results showed that father-absent adolescents had better adherence to the IDDM treatment regimen, despite the fact that adolescents from intact families reported significantly more maternal support for treatment. In addition, single mothers reported relatively high parental competence; and statistical interaction effects indicated that single mothers of girls were more involved in the daily treatment of IDDM, consisting of both positive and negative interactions, than single mothers of boys. There were no between-groups differences for adolescents' metabolic control or social competence. Together, these findings suggested that the father-absent adolescents have adjusted very well to living with one parent and a chronic illness.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)243-252
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Applied Developmental Psychology
Volume9
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1988

Fingerprint

Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus
Fathers
Mothers
Mental Competency
Therapeutics
Self Report
Analysis of Variance
Hemoglobins
Chronic Disease

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

Cite this

Father-absent adolescents with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus : A population at risk? / Hanson, Cindy L.; Henggeler, Scott W.; Rodrigue, James R.; Burghen, George A.; Murphy, William.

In: Journal of Applied Developmental Psychology, Vol. 9, No. 2, 01.01.1988, p. 243-252.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hanson, Cindy L. ; Henggeler, Scott W. ; Rodrigue, James R. ; Burghen, George A. ; Murphy, William. / Father-absent adolescents with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus : A population at risk?. In: Journal of Applied Developmental Psychology. 1988 ; Vol. 9, No. 2. pp. 243-252.
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