Feasibility of Intensive Parent–Child Interaction Therapy (I-PCIT): Results from an Open Trial

Paulo A. Graziano, Daniel M. Bagner, Janine Slavec, Gabriela Hungerford, Kristine Kent, Dara Babinski, Karen Derefinko, Dave Pasalich

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The current pilot study examined the feasibility, acceptability, and initial outcome of an intensive and more condensed version of Parent–child Interaction Therapy (90 min sessions for 5 days/week over the course of 2 weeks). Using an open trial design, 11 children (M child age = 5.01 years) and their mothers completed a baseline period of 2 weeks, a treatment period of 2 weeks, and a post-treatment evaluation. A follow-up evaluation was also conducted 4 months following treatment completion. Across all assessments, mothers completed measures of child behavior and parenting stress, and observational data was collected during three 5-min standard situations that vary in the degree of parental control (child-led play, parent-led play, & clean-up). All 11 families completed the intervention with extremely high attendance and reported high satisfaction. Results across both mother report and observations showed that: a) externalizing behavior problems were stable during the baseline period; b) treatment was effective in reducing externalizing behavior problems (ds = 1.67–2.50), improving parenting skills (ds = 1.93–6.04), and decreasing parenting stress (d = 0.91); and c) treatment gains were maintained at follow-up (ds = 0.53–3.50). Overall, preliminary data suggest that a brief and intensive format of a parent-training intervention is a feasible and effective treatment for young children with externalizing behavior problems with clinical implications for improving children’s behavioral impairment in a very brief period of time.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)38-49
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Psychopathology and Behavioral Assessment
Volume37
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2015

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Parenting
Mothers
Therapeutics
Child Behavior
Problem Behavior

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Clinical Psychology

Cite this

Graziano, P. A., Bagner, D. M., Slavec, J., Hungerford, G., Kent, K., Babinski, D., ... Pasalich, D. (2015). Feasibility of Intensive Parent–Child Interaction Therapy (I-PCIT): Results from an Open Trial. Journal of Psychopathology and Behavioral Assessment, 37(1), 38-49. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10862-014-9435-0

Feasibility of Intensive Parent–Child Interaction Therapy (I-PCIT) : Results from an Open Trial. / Graziano, Paulo A.; Bagner, Daniel M.; Slavec, Janine; Hungerford, Gabriela; Kent, Kristine; Babinski, Dara; Derefinko, Karen; Pasalich, Dave.

In: Journal of Psychopathology and Behavioral Assessment, Vol. 37, No. 1, 01.01.2015, p. 38-49.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Graziano, Paulo A. ; Bagner, Daniel M. ; Slavec, Janine ; Hungerford, Gabriela ; Kent, Kristine ; Babinski, Dara ; Derefinko, Karen ; Pasalich, Dave. / Feasibility of Intensive Parent–Child Interaction Therapy (I-PCIT) : Results from an Open Trial. In: Journal of Psychopathology and Behavioral Assessment. 2015 ; Vol. 37, No. 1. pp. 38-49.
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