Ferret thoracic anatomy by 2-deoxy-2-(18F)fluoro-D-glucose (18F-FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (18F-FDG PET/CT) imaging.

Albert Wu, Huaiyu Zheng, Jennifer Kraenzle, Ashley Biller, Carol D. Vanover, Mary Proctor, Leslie Sherwood, Marlene Steffen, Chin Ng, Daniel J. Mollura, Colleen Jonsson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The domestic ferret (Mustela putorius furo) has been a long-standing animal model used in the evaluation and treatment of human diseases. Molecular imaging techniques such as 2-deoxy-2-((18)F)fluoro-D-glucose ((18)F-FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) would be an invaluable method of tracking disease in vivo, but this technique has not been reported in the literature. Thus, the aim of this study was to establish baseline imaging characteristics of PET/computed tomography (CT) with (18)F-FDG in the ferret model. Twelve healthy female ferrets were anesthetized and underwent combined PET/CT scanning. After the images were fused, volumes of interest (VOIs) were generated in the liver, heart, thymus, and bilateral lung fields. For each VOI, standardized uptake values (SUVs) were calculated. Additional comparisons were made between radiotracer uptake periods (60, 90, and >90 minutes), intravenous and intraperitoneal injections of (18)F-FDG, and respiratory gated and ungated acquisitions. Pulmonary structures and the surrounding thoracic and upper abdominal anatomy were readily identified on the CT scans of all ferrets and were successfully fused with PET. VOIs were created in various tissues with the following SUV calculations: heart (maximum standardized uptake value [SUV(Max)] 8.60, mean standardized uptake value [SUV(Mean)] 5.42), thymus (SUV(Max) 3.86, SUV(Mean) 2.59), liver (SUV(Max) 1.37, SUV(Mean) 0.99), right lung (SUV(Max) 0.92, SUV(Mean) 0.56), and left lung (SUV(Max) 0.88, SUV(Mean) 0.51). Sixty- to 90-minute uptake periods were sufficient to separate tissues based on background SUV activity. No gross differences in image quality were seen between intraperitoneal and intravenous injections of (18)F-FDG. Respiratory gating also did not have a significant impact on image quality of lung parenchyma. The authors concluded that (18)F-FDG PET and CT imaging can be performed successfully in normal healthy ferrets with the parameters identified in this study. They obtained similar imaging features and uptake measurements with and without respiratory gating as well as with intraperitoneal and intravenous (18)F-FDG injections. (18)F-FDG PET and CT can be a valuable resource for the in vivo tracking of disease progression in future studies that employ the ferret model.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalUnknown Journal
Volume53
Issue number1
StatePublished - Jan 1 2012

Fingerprint

positron-emission tomography
Ferrets
Positron emission tomography
ferrets
Fluorodeoxyglucose F18
chest
computed tomography
Tomography
Anatomy
Thorax
image analysis
Imaging techniques
Glucose
glucose
lungs
Lung
Thymus
Liver
Image quality
intraperitoneal injection

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Animal Science and Zoology
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)

Cite this

Ferret thoracic anatomy by 2-deoxy-2-(18F)fluoro-D-glucose (18F-FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (18F-FDG PET/CT) imaging. / Wu, Albert; Zheng, Huaiyu; Kraenzle, Jennifer; Biller, Ashley; Vanover, Carol D.; Proctor, Mary; Sherwood, Leslie; Steffen, Marlene; Ng, Chin; Mollura, Daniel J.; Jonsson, Colleen.

In: Unknown Journal, Vol. 53, No. 1, 01.01.2012.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Wu, A, Zheng, H, Kraenzle, J, Biller, A, Vanover, CD, Proctor, M, Sherwood, L, Steffen, M, Ng, C, Mollura, DJ & Jonsson, C 2012, 'Ferret thoracic anatomy by 2-deoxy-2-(18F)fluoro-D-glucose (18F-FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (18F-FDG PET/CT) imaging.', Unknown Journal, vol. 53, no. 1.
Wu, Albert ; Zheng, Huaiyu ; Kraenzle, Jennifer ; Biller, Ashley ; Vanover, Carol D. ; Proctor, Mary ; Sherwood, Leslie ; Steffen, Marlene ; Ng, Chin ; Mollura, Daniel J. ; Jonsson, Colleen. / Ferret thoracic anatomy by 2-deoxy-2-(18F)fluoro-D-glucose (18F-FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (18F-FDG PET/CT) imaging. In: Unknown Journal. 2012 ; Vol. 53, No. 1.
@article{9907758eb4d443c78e44b407a56c36b7,
title = "Ferret thoracic anatomy by 2-deoxy-2-(18F)fluoro-D-glucose (18F-FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (18F-FDG PET/CT) imaging.",
abstract = "The domestic ferret (Mustela putorius furo) has been a long-standing animal model used in the evaluation and treatment of human diseases. Molecular imaging techniques such as 2-deoxy-2-((18)F)fluoro-D-glucose ((18)F-FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) would be an invaluable method of tracking disease in vivo, but this technique has not been reported in the literature. Thus, the aim of this study was to establish baseline imaging characteristics of PET/computed tomography (CT) with (18)F-FDG in the ferret model. Twelve healthy female ferrets were anesthetized and underwent combined PET/CT scanning. After the images were fused, volumes of interest (VOIs) were generated in the liver, heart, thymus, and bilateral lung fields. For each VOI, standardized uptake values (SUVs) were calculated. Additional comparisons were made between radiotracer uptake periods (60, 90, and >90 minutes), intravenous and intraperitoneal injections of (18)F-FDG, and respiratory gated and ungated acquisitions. Pulmonary structures and the surrounding thoracic and upper abdominal anatomy were readily identified on the CT scans of all ferrets and were successfully fused with PET. VOIs were created in various tissues with the following SUV calculations: heart (maximum standardized uptake value [SUV(Max)] 8.60, mean standardized uptake value [SUV(Mean)] 5.42), thymus (SUV(Max) 3.86, SUV(Mean) 2.59), liver (SUV(Max) 1.37, SUV(Mean) 0.99), right lung (SUV(Max) 0.92, SUV(Mean) 0.56), and left lung (SUV(Max) 0.88, SUV(Mean) 0.51). Sixty- to 90-minute uptake periods were sufficient to separate tissues based on background SUV activity. No gross differences in image quality were seen between intraperitoneal and intravenous injections of (18)F-FDG. Respiratory gating also did not have a significant impact on image quality of lung parenchyma. The authors concluded that (18)F-FDG PET and CT imaging can be performed successfully in normal healthy ferrets with the parameters identified in this study. They obtained similar imaging features and uptake measurements with and without respiratory gating as well as with intraperitoneal and intravenous (18)F-FDG injections. (18)F-FDG PET and CT can be a valuable resource for the in vivo tracking of disease progression in future studies that employ the ferret model.",
author = "Albert Wu and Huaiyu Zheng and Jennifer Kraenzle and Ashley Biller and Vanover, {Carol D.} and Mary Proctor and Leslie Sherwood and Marlene Steffen and Chin Ng and Mollura, {Daniel J.} and Colleen Jonsson",
year = "2012",
month = "1",
day = "1",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "53",
journal = "Hematology / the Education Program of the American Society of Hematology. American Society of Hematology. Education Program",
issn = "1520-4391",
publisher = "American Society of Hematology",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Ferret thoracic anatomy by 2-deoxy-2-(18F)fluoro-D-glucose (18F-FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (18F-FDG PET/CT) imaging.

AU - Wu, Albert

AU - Zheng, Huaiyu

AU - Kraenzle, Jennifer

AU - Biller, Ashley

AU - Vanover, Carol D.

AU - Proctor, Mary

AU - Sherwood, Leslie

AU - Steffen, Marlene

AU - Ng, Chin

AU - Mollura, Daniel J.

AU - Jonsson, Colleen

PY - 2012/1/1

Y1 - 2012/1/1

N2 - The domestic ferret (Mustela putorius furo) has been a long-standing animal model used in the evaluation and treatment of human diseases. Molecular imaging techniques such as 2-deoxy-2-((18)F)fluoro-D-glucose ((18)F-FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) would be an invaluable method of tracking disease in vivo, but this technique has not been reported in the literature. Thus, the aim of this study was to establish baseline imaging characteristics of PET/computed tomography (CT) with (18)F-FDG in the ferret model. Twelve healthy female ferrets were anesthetized and underwent combined PET/CT scanning. After the images were fused, volumes of interest (VOIs) were generated in the liver, heart, thymus, and bilateral lung fields. For each VOI, standardized uptake values (SUVs) were calculated. Additional comparisons were made between radiotracer uptake periods (60, 90, and >90 minutes), intravenous and intraperitoneal injections of (18)F-FDG, and respiratory gated and ungated acquisitions. Pulmonary structures and the surrounding thoracic and upper abdominal anatomy were readily identified on the CT scans of all ferrets and were successfully fused with PET. VOIs were created in various tissues with the following SUV calculations: heart (maximum standardized uptake value [SUV(Max)] 8.60, mean standardized uptake value [SUV(Mean)] 5.42), thymus (SUV(Max) 3.86, SUV(Mean) 2.59), liver (SUV(Max) 1.37, SUV(Mean) 0.99), right lung (SUV(Max) 0.92, SUV(Mean) 0.56), and left lung (SUV(Max) 0.88, SUV(Mean) 0.51). Sixty- to 90-minute uptake periods were sufficient to separate tissues based on background SUV activity. No gross differences in image quality were seen between intraperitoneal and intravenous injections of (18)F-FDG. Respiratory gating also did not have a significant impact on image quality of lung parenchyma. The authors concluded that (18)F-FDG PET and CT imaging can be performed successfully in normal healthy ferrets with the parameters identified in this study. They obtained similar imaging features and uptake measurements with and without respiratory gating as well as with intraperitoneal and intravenous (18)F-FDG injections. (18)F-FDG PET and CT can be a valuable resource for the in vivo tracking of disease progression in future studies that employ the ferret model.

AB - The domestic ferret (Mustela putorius furo) has been a long-standing animal model used in the evaluation and treatment of human diseases. Molecular imaging techniques such as 2-deoxy-2-((18)F)fluoro-D-glucose ((18)F-FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) would be an invaluable method of tracking disease in vivo, but this technique has not been reported in the literature. Thus, the aim of this study was to establish baseline imaging characteristics of PET/computed tomography (CT) with (18)F-FDG in the ferret model. Twelve healthy female ferrets were anesthetized and underwent combined PET/CT scanning. After the images were fused, volumes of interest (VOIs) were generated in the liver, heart, thymus, and bilateral lung fields. For each VOI, standardized uptake values (SUVs) were calculated. Additional comparisons were made between radiotracer uptake periods (60, 90, and >90 minutes), intravenous and intraperitoneal injections of (18)F-FDG, and respiratory gated and ungated acquisitions. Pulmonary structures and the surrounding thoracic and upper abdominal anatomy were readily identified on the CT scans of all ferrets and were successfully fused with PET. VOIs were created in various tissues with the following SUV calculations: heart (maximum standardized uptake value [SUV(Max)] 8.60, mean standardized uptake value [SUV(Mean)] 5.42), thymus (SUV(Max) 3.86, SUV(Mean) 2.59), liver (SUV(Max) 1.37, SUV(Mean) 0.99), right lung (SUV(Max) 0.92, SUV(Mean) 0.56), and left lung (SUV(Max) 0.88, SUV(Mean) 0.51). Sixty- to 90-minute uptake periods were sufficient to separate tissues based on background SUV activity. No gross differences in image quality were seen between intraperitoneal and intravenous injections of (18)F-FDG. Respiratory gating also did not have a significant impact on image quality of lung parenchyma. The authors concluded that (18)F-FDG PET and CT imaging can be performed successfully in normal healthy ferrets with the parameters identified in this study. They obtained similar imaging features and uptake measurements with and without respiratory gating as well as with intraperitoneal and intravenous (18)F-FDG injections. (18)F-FDG PET and CT can be a valuable resource for the in vivo tracking of disease progression in future studies that employ the ferret model.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84881228620&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84881228620&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

C2 - 23382267

AN - SCOPUS:84881228620

VL - 53

JO - Hematology / the Education Program of the American Society of Hematology. American Society of Hematology. Education Program

JF - Hematology / the Education Program of the American Society of Hematology. American Society of Hematology. Education Program

SN - 1520-4391

IS - 1

ER -