Fetal cells in maternal blood

Recovery by charge flow separation

Stephen S. Wachtel, David Sammons, Michael Manley, Gwendolyn Wachtel, Garland Twitty, Joseph Utermohlen, Owen Phillips, Lee P. Shulman, Douglas J. Taron, Uwe R. Müller, Peter Koeppen, Teresa M. Ruffalo, Karen Addis, Richard Porreco, Joyce Murata-Collins, Natalie B. Parker, Loris McGavran

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

62 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Fetal blood cells can be recovered from the maternal circulation by charge flow separation (CFS), a method that obviates the risks associated with amniocentesis and chorionic villus sampling. By CFS, we processed blood samples from 13 women carrying male fetuses, 2 carrying fetuses with trisomy 21, and 1 who had delivered a stillborn infant with trisomy 18. On average more than 2000 fetal nucleated red blood cells were recovered per 20-ml sample of maternal blood. Recovery of fetal cells was confirmed by fluorescence in situ hybridization with probes for chromosomes Y, 18 and 21. After culturing of CFS-processed cells, amplification by the polymerase chain reaction revealed Y-chromosomal DNA in clones from four of six women bearing male fetuses, but not in clones from three women bearing female fetuses.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)162-166
Number of pages5
JournalHuman genetics
Volume98
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 30 1996

Fingerprint

Fetus
Mothers
Clone Cells
Chorionic Villi Sampling
Chromosomes, Human, Pair 18
Chromosomes, Human, Pair 21
Amniocentesis
Cell Separation
Down Syndrome
Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization
Fetal Blood
Blood Cells
Erythrocytes
Polymerase Chain Reaction
DNA

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Genetics
  • Genetics(clinical)

Cite this

Wachtel, S. S., Sammons, D., Manley, M., Wachtel, G., Twitty, G., Utermohlen, J., ... McGavran, L. (1996). Fetal cells in maternal blood: Recovery by charge flow separation. Human genetics, 98(2), 162-166. https://doi.org/10.1007/s004390050181

Fetal cells in maternal blood : Recovery by charge flow separation. / Wachtel, Stephen S.; Sammons, David; Manley, Michael; Wachtel, Gwendolyn; Twitty, Garland; Utermohlen, Joseph; Phillips, Owen; Shulman, Lee P.; Taron, Douglas J.; Müller, Uwe R.; Koeppen, Peter; Ruffalo, Teresa M.; Addis, Karen; Porreco, Richard; Murata-Collins, Joyce; Parker, Natalie B.; McGavran, Loris.

In: Human genetics, Vol. 98, No. 2, 30.07.1996, p. 162-166.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Wachtel, SS, Sammons, D, Manley, M, Wachtel, G, Twitty, G, Utermohlen, J, Phillips, O, Shulman, LP, Taron, DJ, Müller, UR, Koeppen, P, Ruffalo, TM, Addis, K, Porreco, R, Murata-Collins, J, Parker, NB & McGavran, L 1996, 'Fetal cells in maternal blood: Recovery by charge flow separation', Human genetics, vol. 98, no. 2, pp. 162-166. https://doi.org/10.1007/s004390050181
Wachtel SS, Sammons D, Manley M, Wachtel G, Twitty G, Utermohlen J et al. Fetal cells in maternal blood: Recovery by charge flow separation. Human genetics. 1996 Jul 30;98(2):162-166. https://doi.org/10.1007/s004390050181
Wachtel, Stephen S. ; Sammons, David ; Manley, Michael ; Wachtel, Gwendolyn ; Twitty, Garland ; Utermohlen, Joseph ; Phillips, Owen ; Shulman, Lee P. ; Taron, Douglas J. ; Müller, Uwe R. ; Koeppen, Peter ; Ruffalo, Teresa M. ; Addis, Karen ; Porreco, Richard ; Murata-Collins, Joyce ; Parker, Natalie B. ; McGavran, Loris. / Fetal cells in maternal blood : Recovery by charge flow separation. In: Human genetics. 1996 ; Vol. 98, No. 2. pp. 162-166.
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