FFAs: Do they play a role in vascular disease in the insulin resistance syndrome?

Sudha S. Shankar, Helmut Steinberg

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

24 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The insulin resistance syndrome, otherwise known as the metabolic syndrome, describes a cluster of cardiovascular and metabolic abnormalities, which are strongly associated with overweight and obesity. The importance of the syndrome is due to its increased rates of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Insulin resistance is also characterized by elevated free fatty acid, (FFA) levels. In otherwise healthy human subjects, elevation of FFA impairs endothelial function. This appears to be largely the result of blunting of nitric oxide-dependent tone, most likely at the level of the endothelial isoform of nitric oxide synthase (eNOS). Some of the potential mediatory mechanisms include oxidative stress, proinflammatory cytokines, C-reactive protein, or endogenous inhibitors of eNOS. Regardless of the mechanism(s) that mediates the effects of increased FFA on the vasculature, impaired vascular function is likely to account at least in part, for the increase in cardiovascular mortality in subjects with the insulin resistance syndrome.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)30-35
Number of pages6
JournalCurrent Diabetes Reports
Volume5
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2005
Externally publishedYes

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Vascular Diseases
Insulin Resistance
Nonesterified Fatty Acids
Nitric Oxide Synthase Type III
Protein Isoforms
Cardiovascular Abnormalities
Mortality
C-Reactive Protein
Blood Vessels
Healthy Volunteers
Nitric Oxide
Oxidative Stress
Obesity
Cytokines
Morbidity

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Internal Medicine
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism

Cite this

FFAs : Do they play a role in vascular disease in the insulin resistance syndrome? / Shankar, Sudha S.; Steinberg, Helmut.

In: Current Diabetes Reports, Vol. 5, No. 1, 01.01.2005, p. 30-35.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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