Fibrosis and hypertensive heart disease

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

226 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The normal myocardium is composed of a variety of cells: cardiac myocytes and noncardiomyocytes, which include endothelial and vascular smooth muscle cells and fibroblasts. Hypertensive heart disease involves a structural remodeling of muscular and nonmuscular compartments. It is not the quantity but rather the quality of myocardium that accounts for pathologic hypertrophy and predisposes to ventricular dysfunction and arrhythmias, which, in turn, confer increased risk of adverse cardiovascular events. Herein, factors regulating growth of these compartments are reviewed and in particular signals involved in promoting adverse remodeling of intramyocardial coronary arteries and arterioles by fibrous tissue. (C) 2000 Lippincott Williams and Wilkins, Inc.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)264-272
Number of pages9
JournalCurrent Opinion in Cardiology
Volume15
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 12 2000

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Heart Diseases
Myocardium
Fibrosis
Ventricular Dysfunction
Arterioles
Vascular Smooth Muscle
Cardiac Myocytes
Hypertrophy
Smooth Muscle Myocytes
Cardiac Arrhythmias
Intercellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins
Coronary Vessels
Fibroblasts

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Fibrosis and hypertensive heart disease. / Weber, Karl.

In: Current Opinion in Cardiology, Vol. 15, No. 4, 12.08.2000, p. 264-272.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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