Fish consumption and breast cancer risk

Paul Terry, Thomas E. Rohan, Alicja Wolk, Marianne Maehle-Schmidt, Cecilia Magnusson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

21 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The ω-3 fatty acids, especially long-chain eicosapentaenoic acid (20:5n-3) and docosahexaenoic (22:6n-3) contained in "fatty" fish, have consistently been shown to retard the growth of breast cancer in vitro and in animal experiments. In contrast, studies of the association between fish consumption and breast cancer risk in human populations have not consistently shown inverse associations. However, previous studies have not considered the specific types of fish consumed. Using data from a large, nationwide case-control study conducted in Sweden, we examined the association between consumption of fatty and lean fish and breast cancer risk. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals were computed from unconditional logistic regression models. High consumption of fish was weakly associated with reduced breast cancer risk, and the association was not statistically significant. With multivariate adjustment, the OR for women with the highest consumption (≥3.5 servings/wk) compared with women with the lowest (virtually none) was 0.88 (95% confidence interval = 0.60-1.29, P for trend = 0.15). When type of fish was examined separately, the association was similar for fatty and lean fish.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-6
Number of pages6
JournalNutrition and Cancer
Volume44
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2002

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Fishes
Breast Neoplasms
Logistic Models
Odds Ratio
Confidence Intervals
Eicosapentaenoic Acid
Sweden
Case-Control Studies
Fatty Acids
Growth
Population

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Oncology
  • Nutrition and Dietetics
  • Cancer Research

Cite this

Terry, P., Rohan, T. E., Wolk, A., Maehle-Schmidt, M., & Magnusson, C. (2002). Fish consumption and breast cancer risk. Nutrition and Cancer, 44(1), 1-6. https://doi.org/10.1207/S15327914NC441_1

Fish consumption and breast cancer risk. / Terry, Paul; Rohan, Thomas E.; Wolk, Alicja; Maehle-Schmidt, Marianne; Magnusson, Cecilia.

In: Nutrition and Cancer, Vol. 44, No. 1, 01.01.2002, p. 1-6.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Terry, P, Rohan, TE, Wolk, A, Maehle-Schmidt, M & Magnusson, C 2002, 'Fish consumption and breast cancer risk', Nutrition and Cancer, vol. 44, no. 1, pp. 1-6. https://doi.org/10.1207/S15327914NC441_1
Terry P, Rohan TE, Wolk A, Maehle-Schmidt M, Magnusson C. Fish consumption and breast cancer risk. Nutrition and Cancer. 2002 Jan 1;44(1):1-6. https://doi.org/10.1207/S15327914NC441_1
Terry, Paul ; Rohan, Thomas E. ; Wolk, Alicja ; Maehle-Schmidt, Marianne ; Magnusson, Cecilia. / Fish consumption and breast cancer risk. In: Nutrition and Cancer. 2002 ; Vol. 44, No. 1. pp. 1-6.
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