Fish-Odor Syndrome Presenting as Dysosmia

Donald A. Leopold, George Preti, Maxwell M. Mozell, Steven Youngentob, H. N. Wright

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

23 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We describe a patient who had perceived an unpleasant odor or taste for at least 20 years. Several other physicians had unsuccessfully treated her for infections, mucus membrane dryness and inflammation, chronic tonsillitis, and psychiatric disorders. Her workup at the State University of New York Health Science Center at Syracuse Olfactory Referral Center included a thorough history, examinations (including endoscopic studies of her nose, pharynx, and lungs), roentgenograms, taste testing, olfactory testing, and selective anesthesia of her chemosensory areas. The perception occurred only during exhalation, and appeared to be binasal. These findings, together with her morning mucus sample having a strong fishlike odor, prompted us to suspect a metabolic problem. Further testing at the Monell-Jefferson Chemosensory Clinical Research Center, Philadelphia, Pa, confirmed that she had trimethylaminuria. It is important to consider this and other treatable conditions when evaluating individuals with olfactory complaints. (Arch Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 1990;116:354-355).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)354-355
Number of pages2
JournalArchives of Otolaryngology--Head and Neck Surgery
Volume116
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1990
Externally publishedYes

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Olfaction Disorders
Mucus
Exhalation
Tonsillitis
Pharynx
Nose
Psychiatry
Referral and Consultation
Anesthesia
History
Head
Inflammation
Physicians
Lung
Membranes
Health
Infection
Research
Trimethylaminuria
Odorants

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Surgery
  • Otorhinolaryngology

Cite this

Fish-Odor Syndrome Presenting as Dysosmia. / Leopold, Donald A.; Preti, George; Mozell, Maxwell M.; Youngentob, Steven; Wright, H. N.

In: Archives of Otolaryngology--Head and Neck Surgery, Vol. 116, No. 3, 01.01.1990, p. 354-355.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Leopold, Donald A. ; Preti, George ; Mozell, Maxwell M. ; Youngentob, Steven ; Wright, H. N. / Fish-Odor Syndrome Presenting as Dysosmia. In: Archives of Otolaryngology--Head and Neck Surgery. 1990 ; Vol. 116, No. 3. pp. 354-355.
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