Flexural strength and flexural fatigue properties of resin-modified glass ionomers

Cornelis H. Pameijer, Franklin Garcia-Godoy, Brian R. Morrow, Steven R. Jefferies

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

• Objective: To determine the physical properties of several resin-modified glass ionomers (RMGIs) by means of flexural strength and flexural fatigue testing, and to compare them to conventional glass ionomer cements (GICs) and flowable composite resins • Methods: RMGI samples were fabricated according to ISO 4049 standard. Rectangular specimens were produced using a polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) mold with dimensions of 2 × 2 × 25 mm. Flexural strength and flexural fatigue were measured by means of the 3-point bending tests using an Instron universal testing machine at 0.75mm/min and 0.03Hz for 100 cycles, respectively. Flexural stress, load, and displacement were recorded for all tests. Data were statistically compared (ANOVA, SNK, p < 0.05). Statistical data analysis for flexural fatigue was achieved through the least frequent events method (failures versus non-failures). The following RMGIs, flowable composites, and GICs were tested: 1) Activa Bioactive-Restorative; 2) Activa Bioactiye-Base/Liner; 3) Tetric EvoFlow; 4) Beautifil Flow Plus; 5) Geristore; 6) Fuji Filling LC; 7) Fuji Lining LC; 8) Ketac Nano; 9) Fuji Triage; 10) Ketac Nano; and 11) Vitrebond Plus. • Results: The flexural strength of Activa-enhanced RMGIs was statistically significantly greater than all other RMGIs and GICs (p < 0.001). The flexural fatigue of Activa-enhanced RMGIs and flowable composites was significantly greater than all other materials (p < 0.001). The flexural fatigue of the Activa-enhanced RMGIs was comparable to the two flowable composites tested. • Conclusion: The Activa-enhanced RMGIs demonstrated comparable flexural strength and flexural fatigue to flowable composites. Activa-enhanced RMGIs and flowable composites demonstrated flexural strength and flexural fatigue significantly greater than all other tested materials.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)23-27
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Clinical Dentistry
Volume26
Issue number1
StatePublished - Jan 1 2015

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Fatigue
Glass Ionomer Cements
glass ionomer
Statistical Data Interpretation
Composite Resins
Triage
Polytetrafluoroethylene
flowable hybrid composite
Analysis of Variance
Fungi

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Dentistry(all)

Cite this

Flexural strength and flexural fatigue properties of resin-modified glass ionomers. / Pameijer, Cornelis H.; Garcia-Godoy, Franklin; Morrow, Brian R.; Jefferies, Steven R.

In: Journal of Clinical Dentistry, Vol. 26, No. 1, 01.01.2015, p. 23-27.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Pameijer, Cornelis H. ; Garcia-Godoy, Franklin ; Morrow, Brian R. ; Jefferies, Steven R. / Flexural strength and flexural fatigue properties of resin-modified glass ionomers. In: Journal of Clinical Dentistry. 2015 ; Vol. 26, No. 1. pp. 23-27.
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