Fluid-level motion artifact in computed tomography

Randall Scott, S. Payne, M. L. Pinstein

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Ingestion of oral contrast material as a routine part of abdominal computerized tomographic scanning creates numerous gas and fluid interfaces within the gastrointestinal tract. Following deep inspiration or expiration, fluid motion induced by shifting intra-abdominal contents persists for several seconds. This causes radial streak artifacts to arise from air-fluid interfaces, even though respiration is suspended while the scan is made. Such artifacts can be reduced if the beginning of a scan is delayed to allow fluid motion to stop. An alternative is to re-scan an area of interest in the lateral decubitus position so as to shift air-fluid levels and their associated artifacts away from any region in question.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)294-295
Number of pages2
JournalCanadian Association of Radiologists Journal
Volume34
Issue number4
StatePublished - 1983

Fingerprint

Artifacts
Tomography
Air
Fluid Shifts
Contrast Media
Gastrointestinal Tract
Respiration
Eating
Gases

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging

Cite this

Fluid-level motion artifact in computed tomography. / Scott, Randall; Payne, S.; Pinstein, M. L.

In: Canadian Association of Radiologists Journal, Vol. 34, No. 4, 1983, p. 294-295.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Scott, Randall ; Payne, S. ; Pinstein, M. L. / Fluid-level motion artifact in computed tomography. In: Canadian Association of Radiologists Journal. 1983 ; Vol. 34, No. 4. pp. 294-295.
@article{bb5b7599d1b8458c8e5dfc98e4a43fe8,
title = "Fluid-level motion artifact in computed tomography",
abstract = "Ingestion of oral contrast material as a routine part of abdominal computerized tomographic scanning creates numerous gas and fluid interfaces within the gastrointestinal tract. Following deep inspiration or expiration, fluid motion induced by shifting intra-abdominal contents persists for several seconds. This causes radial streak artifacts to arise from air-fluid interfaces, even though respiration is suspended while the scan is made. Such artifacts can be reduced if the beginning of a scan is delayed to allow fluid motion to stop. An alternative is to re-scan an area of interest in the lateral decubitus position so as to shift air-fluid levels and their associated artifacts away from any region in question.",
author = "Randall Scott and S. Payne and Pinstein, {M. L.}",
year = "1983",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "34",
pages = "294--295",
journal = "Canadian Association of Radiologists Journal",
issn = "0846-5371",
publisher = "Canadian Medical Association",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Fluid-level motion artifact in computed tomography

AU - Scott, Randall

AU - Payne, S.

AU - Pinstein, M. L.

PY - 1983

Y1 - 1983

N2 - Ingestion of oral contrast material as a routine part of abdominal computerized tomographic scanning creates numerous gas and fluid interfaces within the gastrointestinal tract. Following deep inspiration or expiration, fluid motion induced by shifting intra-abdominal contents persists for several seconds. This causes radial streak artifacts to arise from air-fluid interfaces, even though respiration is suspended while the scan is made. Such artifacts can be reduced if the beginning of a scan is delayed to allow fluid motion to stop. An alternative is to re-scan an area of interest in the lateral decubitus position so as to shift air-fluid levels and their associated artifacts away from any region in question.

AB - Ingestion of oral contrast material as a routine part of abdominal computerized tomographic scanning creates numerous gas and fluid interfaces within the gastrointestinal tract. Following deep inspiration or expiration, fluid motion induced by shifting intra-abdominal contents persists for several seconds. This causes radial streak artifacts to arise from air-fluid interfaces, even though respiration is suspended while the scan is made. Such artifacts can be reduced if the beginning of a scan is delayed to allow fluid motion to stop. An alternative is to re-scan an area of interest in the lateral decubitus position so as to shift air-fluid levels and their associated artifacts away from any region in question.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0021050964&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0021050964&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

VL - 34

SP - 294

EP - 295

JO - Canadian Association of Radiologists Journal

JF - Canadian Association of Radiologists Journal

SN - 0846-5371

IS - 4

ER -