Fluid-shear method to evaluate bacterial adhesion to glass surfaces

Yan Zhou, Ashley Torres, Liangxian Chen, Ying Kong, Jeffrey D. Cirillo, H. Liang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Adhered bacteria onto different surfaces cause infection that affects our health and environments. The understanding of the bacterial adhesive strength is crucial for better control and safe manufacturing in order to design adhesion resistant materials. The current evaluation methods lack precision and are often time consuming. In the present research, we developed a fluid-shear method to quantitatively evaluate bacterial adhesive strength on glass substrates. The glass was chosen based on its abundance in household, industrial, and medical environments. The fluid shear stress applied by a rheometer ranged from 0 to 3 Pa and the average surface roughness (Ra) of glass ranged from 1 to 23 nm. Bacterial adhesive stress was calculated based on the measurement of the critical radius. It was also found that the adhesive strength decreased with the increase of surface roughness, while the number of adhered bacteria increased when the surface become rougher. The fluid-shear method was proven to be effective in measure bacterial adhesion on a surface.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number014703
JournalJournal of Applied Physics
Volume112
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2012

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adhesives
adhesion
shear
glass
fluids
bacteria
surface roughness
rheometers
infectious diseases
shear stress
health
manufacturing
radii
evaluation
causes

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Physics and Astronomy(all)

Cite this

Fluid-shear method to evaluate bacterial adhesion to glass surfaces. / Zhou, Yan; Torres, Ashley; Chen, Liangxian; Kong, Ying; Cirillo, Jeffrey D.; Liang, H.

In: Journal of Applied Physics, Vol. 112, No. 1, 014703, 01.07.2012.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Zhou, Yan ; Torres, Ashley ; Chen, Liangxian ; Kong, Ying ; Cirillo, Jeffrey D. ; Liang, H. / Fluid-shear method to evaluate bacterial adhesion to glass surfaces. In: Journal of Applied Physics. 2012 ; Vol. 112, No. 1.
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