Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) regulates polymerase activity of multiple influenza A virus subtypes

Husni Elbahesh, Silke Bergmann, Charles J. Russell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Influenza A viruses (IAVs) cause numerous pandemics and yearly epidemics resulting in ~500,000 annual deaths globally. IAV modulates cellular signaling pathways at every step of the infection cycle. Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) has been shown to play a critical role in endosomal trafficking of influenza A viruses, yet it is unclear how FAK kinase activity regulates IAV replication. Using mini-genomes derived from H1N1, H5N1 and H7N9 viruses, we dissected RNA replication by IAVs independent of viral entry or release. Our results show FAK activity promotes efficient IAV polymerase activity and inhibiting FAK activity with a chemical inhibitor or a kinase-dead mutant significantly reduces IAV polymerase activity. Using co-immunoprecipitations and proximity ligation assays, we observed interactions between FAK and the viral nucleoprotein, supporting a direct role of FAK in IAV replication. Altogether, the data indicates that FAK kinase activity is important in promoting IAV replication by regulating its polymerase activity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)369-374
Number of pages6
JournalVirology
Volume499
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2016

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Focal Adhesion Protein-Tyrosine Kinases
Influenza A virus
Virus Replication
Phosphotransferases
H7N9 Subtype Influenza A Virus
H5N1 Subtype Influenza A Virus
H1N1 Subtype Influenza A Virus
Nucleoproteins
Pandemics
Immunoprecipitation
Ligation
Genome
RNA

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Virology

Cite this

Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) regulates polymerase activity of multiple influenza A virus subtypes. / Elbahesh, Husni; Bergmann, Silke; Russell, Charles J.

In: Virology, Vol. 499, 01.12.2016, p. 369-374.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Elbahesh, Husni ; Bergmann, Silke ; Russell, Charles J. / Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) regulates polymerase activity of multiple influenza A virus subtypes. In: Virology. 2016 ; Vol. 499. pp. 369-374.
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