Food contaminant acrylamide increases expression of Cox-2 and nitric oxide synthase in breast epithelial cells

Lascelles E. Lyn-Cook, Eden Tareke, Beverly Word, Athena Davenport, Beverly D. Lyn-Cook, George J. Hammons

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Acrylamide has been discovered in foods cooked at high temperature. A potentially harmful effect of this dietary component has been suggested by data indicating its association with increased breast cancer. This study investigated the potential effects of acrylamide in nontumorigenic breast cells by assessing expression levels of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cycloogenase-2 (Cox-2) and NOS activity, which are known to be early molecular changes in disease formation. Treatment of cells with acrylamide increased levels of iNOS (both expression and activity) and Cox-2. Its potent metabolite, glycidamide, also induced both iNOS and Cox-2, with induction of iNOS occurring at a lower concentration. 2-Amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP), another food-borne carcinogen, was found to induce Cox-2 expression. Combining acrylamide with PhIP did not result in a further increase. These studies suggest that further research is needed to determine the role of carcinogens formed from cooking foods in inducing early molecular changes associated with breast cancer.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)11-18
Number of pages8
JournalToxicology and Industrial Health
Volume27
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2011
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Acrylamide
Nitric Oxide Synthase Type II
Nitric Oxide Synthase
Breast
Epithelial Cells
Impurities
Food
Carcinogens
Breast Neoplasms
Cooking
Metabolites
Cells
Temperature
Research
2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo(4,5-b)pyridine

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Toxicology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Health, Toxicology and Mutagenesis

Cite this

Food contaminant acrylamide increases expression of Cox-2 and nitric oxide synthase in breast epithelial cells. / Lyn-Cook, Lascelles E.; Tareke, Eden; Word, Beverly; Davenport, Athena; Lyn-Cook, Beverly D.; Hammons, George J.

In: Toxicology and Industrial Health, Vol. 27, No. 1, 01.01.2011, p. 11-18.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lyn-Cook, Lascelles E. ; Tareke, Eden ; Word, Beverly ; Davenport, Athena ; Lyn-Cook, Beverly D. ; Hammons, George J. / Food contaminant acrylamide increases expression of Cox-2 and nitric oxide synthase in breast epithelial cells. In: Toxicology and Industrial Health. 2011 ; Vol. 27, No. 1. pp. 11-18.
@article{dd3c054f584f40378959f1665d6bcd90,
title = "Food contaminant acrylamide increases expression of Cox-2 and nitric oxide synthase in breast epithelial cells",
abstract = "Acrylamide has been discovered in foods cooked at high temperature. A potentially harmful effect of this dietary component has been suggested by data indicating its association with increased breast cancer. This study investigated the potential effects of acrylamide in nontumorigenic breast cells by assessing expression levels of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cycloogenase-2 (Cox-2) and NOS activity, which are known to be early molecular changes in disease formation. Treatment of cells with acrylamide increased levels of iNOS (both expression and activity) and Cox-2. Its potent metabolite, glycidamide, also induced both iNOS and Cox-2, with induction of iNOS occurring at a lower concentration. 2-Amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP), another food-borne carcinogen, was found to induce Cox-2 expression. Combining acrylamide with PhIP did not result in a further increase. These studies suggest that further research is needed to determine the role of carcinogens formed from cooking foods in inducing early molecular changes associated with breast cancer.",
author = "Lyn-Cook, {Lascelles E.} and Eden Tareke and Beverly Word and Athena Davenport and Lyn-Cook, {Beverly D.} and Hammons, {George J.}",
year = "2011",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1177/0748233710380217",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "27",
pages = "11--18",
journal = "Toxicology and Industrial Health",
issn = "0748-2337",
publisher = "SAGE Publications Ltd",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Food contaminant acrylamide increases expression of Cox-2 and nitric oxide synthase in breast epithelial cells

AU - Lyn-Cook, Lascelles E.

AU - Tareke, Eden

AU - Word, Beverly

AU - Davenport, Athena

AU - Lyn-Cook, Beverly D.

AU - Hammons, George J.

PY - 2011/1/1

Y1 - 2011/1/1

N2 - Acrylamide has been discovered in foods cooked at high temperature. A potentially harmful effect of this dietary component has been suggested by data indicating its association with increased breast cancer. This study investigated the potential effects of acrylamide in nontumorigenic breast cells by assessing expression levels of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cycloogenase-2 (Cox-2) and NOS activity, which are known to be early molecular changes in disease formation. Treatment of cells with acrylamide increased levels of iNOS (both expression and activity) and Cox-2. Its potent metabolite, glycidamide, also induced both iNOS and Cox-2, with induction of iNOS occurring at a lower concentration. 2-Amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP), another food-borne carcinogen, was found to induce Cox-2 expression. Combining acrylamide with PhIP did not result in a further increase. These studies suggest that further research is needed to determine the role of carcinogens formed from cooking foods in inducing early molecular changes associated with breast cancer.

AB - Acrylamide has been discovered in foods cooked at high temperature. A potentially harmful effect of this dietary component has been suggested by data indicating its association with increased breast cancer. This study investigated the potential effects of acrylamide in nontumorigenic breast cells by assessing expression levels of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cycloogenase-2 (Cox-2) and NOS activity, which are known to be early molecular changes in disease formation. Treatment of cells with acrylamide increased levels of iNOS (both expression and activity) and Cox-2. Its potent metabolite, glycidamide, also induced both iNOS and Cox-2, with induction of iNOS occurring at a lower concentration. 2-Amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP), another food-borne carcinogen, was found to induce Cox-2 expression. Combining acrylamide with PhIP did not result in a further increase. These studies suggest that further research is needed to determine the role of carcinogens formed from cooking foods in inducing early molecular changes associated with breast cancer.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=78651493801&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=78651493801&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1177/0748233710380217

DO - 10.1177/0748233710380217

M3 - Article

VL - 27

SP - 11

EP - 18

JO - Toxicology and Industrial Health

JF - Toxicology and Industrial Health

SN - 0748-2337

IS - 1

ER -