Fostering itself increases nicotine self-administration in young adult male rats

Emily E. Roguski, Hao Chen, Burt Sharp, Shannon G. Matta

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Rationale: In gestational exposure studies, a fostered group is frequently used to control for drug-induced maternal effects. However, fostering itself has varying effects depending on the parameters under investigation Objectives: This study was designed to assess whether maternal behavior contributed to enhanced acquisition (higher number of bar presses compared to controls) of nicotine self-administration (SA) displayed by offspring with gestational nicotine and ethanol (Nic+EtOH) exposure. Methods: Offspring were exposed to Nic+EtOH throughout full gestation, that is, gestational days (GD) GD2-20 and during postnatal days 2-12 (PN2-12), the rodent third trimester equivalent of human gestation during which rapid brain growth and synaptogenesis occur. Young adult (PN60) male offspring acquired operant nicotine SA, using a model of unlimited (i.e., 23 h) access to nicotine. Results: Gestational drug treatments did not alter litter parameters (body weight, volume distribution, crown-rump length, and brain weight) or postnatal growth of the offspring. Fostering increased locomotor activity to a novel environment on PN45 regardless of gestational treatment group. Surprisingly, fostering per se significantly increased the SA behavior of drug-naïve pair-fed controls, so that their drug-taking behavior resembled the enhanced nicotine SA observed in non-fostered offspring exposed to Nic+EtOH during gestation. In contrast, fostering did not change the SA behavior of the Nic+EtOH group. Conclusions: Fostering is shown to be its own experimental variable, ultimately increasing the acquisition of nicotine SA in control, drug-naïve offspring. As such, the current dogma that fostering is required for our gestationally drug-exposed offspring is contraindicated.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)227-234
Number of pages8
JournalPsychopharmacology
Volume229
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2013

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Self Administration
Foster Home Care
Nicotine
Young Adult
Drug and Narcotic Control
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Pregnancy
Crown-Rump Length
Maternal Behavior
Brain
Third Pregnancy Trimester
Locomotion
Growth
Rodentia
Ethanol
Body Weight
Weights and Measures
Therapeutics

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pharmacology

Cite this

Fostering itself increases nicotine self-administration in young adult male rats. / Roguski, Emily E.; Chen, Hao; Sharp, Burt; Matta, Shannon G.

In: Psychopharmacology, Vol. 229, No. 2, 01.09.2013, p. 227-234.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Roguski, Emily E. ; Chen, Hao ; Sharp, Burt ; Matta, Shannon G. / Fostering itself increases nicotine self-administration in young adult male rats. In: Psychopharmacology. 2013 ; Vol. 229, No. 2. pp. 227-234.
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