Fracture strength of CAD/CAM composite and composite-ceramic occlusal veneers

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

29 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: To determine the effect of material type and restoration thickness on the fracture strength of posterior occlusal veneers made from computer-milled composite (Paradigm MZ100) and composite-ceramic (Lava Ultimate) materials. Methods: 60 maxillary molars were prepared and restored with CAD/CAM occlusal veneer restorations fabricated from either Paradigm MZ100 or Lava Ultimate blocks at minimal occlusal thicknesses of 0.3, 0.6, and 1.0. mm. Restorations were adhesively bonded and subjected to vertical compressive loading. The maximum force at fracture and mode of failure were recorded. 2-Way ANOVA was used to identify any statistically significant relationships between fracture strength and material type or thickness. Spearman's rank correlation coefficient was used to analyze mode of failure with regard to fracture strength. Results: The average maximum loads (N) at fracture for the Paradigm MZ100 groups were 1620. ±. 433, 1830. ±. 501, and 2027. ±. 704 for the material thicknesses of 0.3, 0.6, and 1.0. mm, respectively. The Lava Ultimate groups fractured at slightly higher loads (N) of 2078. ±. 605, 2141. ±. 473, and 2115. ±. 462 at the respective 0.3, 0.6, and 1.0. mm thickness.Statistical analyses revealed that, while no significant difference existed among the various restoration thicknesses in terms of fracture strength (P>. 0.05), the material type was found to be influential (P= 0.04). The maximum load at fracture (N) for Lava Ultimate averaged over all thicknesses (2111. ±. 500) was significantly higher than that of the Paradigm MZ100 (1826. ±. 564). No correlation between mode of failure and fracture strength was found. Conclusions: Under the conditions of this study, the maximal loads at fracture for these "non-ceramic" occlusal veneer restorations were found to be higher than human masticatory forces. Occlusal veneers made from the two materials tested are likely to survive occlusal forces regardless of restoration thickness, with those fabricated from the composite-ceramic hybrid material being more likely to survive heavier loads.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)107-114
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Prosthodontic Research
Volume58
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014

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Computer-Aided Design
Ceramics
Bite Force
Nonparametric Statistics
Analysis of Variance
paradigm MZ100

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Oral Surgery
  • Dentistry (miscellaneous)

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Fracture strength of CAD/CAM composite and composite-ceramic occlusal veneers. / Johnson, Andrew C.; Versluis, Antheunis; Versluis, Daranee; Ahuja, Swati.

In: Journal of Prosthodontic Research, Vol. 58, No. 2, 01.01.2014, p. 107-114.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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author = "Johnson, {Andrew C.} and Antheunis Versluis and Daranee Versluis and Swati Ahuja",
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T1 - Fracture strength of CAD/CAM composite and composite-ceramic occlusal veneers

AU - Johnson, Andrew C.

AU - Versluis, Antheunis

AU - Versluis, Daranee

AU - Ahuja, Swati

PY - 2014/1/1

Y1 - 2014/1/1

N2 - Purpose: To determine the effect of material type and restoration thickness on the fracture strength of posterior occlusal veneers made from computer-milled composite (Paradigm MZ100) and composite-ceramic (Lava Ultimate) materials. Methods: 60 maxillary molars were prepared and restored with CAD/CAM occlusal veneer restorations fabricated from either Paradigm MZ100 or Lava Ultimate blocks at minimal occlusal thicknesses of 0.3, 0.6, and 1.0. mm. Restorations were adhesively bonded and subjected to vertical compressive loading. The maximum force at fracture and mode of failure were recorded. 2-Way ANOVA was used to identify any statistically significant relationships between fracture strength and material type or thickness. Spearman's rank correlation coefficient was used to analyze mode of failure with regard to fracture strength. Results: The average maximum loads (N) at fracture for the Paradigm MZ100 groups were 1620. ±. 433, 1830. ±. 501, and 2027. ±. 704 for the material thicknesses of 0.3, 0.6, and 1.0. mm, respectively. The Lava Ultimate groups fractured at slightly higher loads (N) of 2078. ±. 605, 2141. ±. 473, and 2115. ±. 462 at the respective 0.3, 0.6, and 1.0. mm thickness.Statistical analyses revealed that, while no significant difference existed among the various restoration thicknesses in terms of fracture strength (P>. 0.05), the material type was found to be influential (P= 0.04). The maximum load at fracture (N) for Lava Ultimate averaged over all thicknesses (2111. ±. 500) was significantly higher than that of the Paradigm MZ100 (1826. ±. 564). No correlation between mode of failure and fracture strength was found. Conclusions: Under the conditions of this study, the maximal loads at fracture for these "non-ceramic" occlusal veneer restorations were found to be higher than human masticatory forces. Occlusal veneers made from the two materials tested are likely to survive occlusal forces regardless of restoration thickness, with those fabricated from the composite-ceramic hybrid material being more likely to survive heavier loads.

AB - Purpose: To determine the effect of material type and restoration thickness on the fracture strength of posterior occlusal veneers made from computer-milled composite (Paradigm MZ100) and composite-ceramic (Lava Ultimate) materials. Methods: 60 maxillary molars were prepared and restored with CAD/CAM occlusal veneer restorations fabricated from either Paradigm MZ100 or Lava Ultimate blocks at minimal occlusal thicknesses of 0.3, 0.6, and 1.0. mm. Restorations were adhesively bonded and subjected to vertical compressive loading. The maximum force at fracture and mode of failure were recorded. 2-Way ANOVA was used to identify any statistically significant relationships between fracture strength and material type or thickness. Spearman's rank correlation coefficient was used to analyze mode of failure with regard to fracture strength. Results: The average maximum loads (N) at fracture for the Paradigm MZ100 groups were 1620. ±. 433, 1830. ±. 501, and 2027. ±. 704 for the material thicknesses of 0.3, 0.6, and 1.0. mm, respectively. The Lava Ultimate groups fractured at slightly higher loads (N) of 2078. ±. 605, 2141. ±. 473, and 2115. ±. 462 at the respective 0.3, 0.6, and 1.0. mm thickness.Statistical analyses revealed that, while no significant difference existed among the various restoration thicknesses in terms of fracture strength (P>. 0.05), the material type was found to be influential (P= 0.04). The maximum load at fracture (N) for Lava Ultimate averaged over all thicknesses (2111. ±. 500) was significantly higher than that of the Paradigm MZ100 (1826. ±. 564). No correlation between mode of failure and fracture strength was found. Conclusions: Under the conditions of this study, the maximal loads at fracture for these "non-ceramic" occlusal veneer restorations were found to be higher than human masticatory forces. Occlusal veneers made from the two materials tested are likely to survive occlusal forces regardless of restoration thickness, with those fabricated from the composite-ceramic hybrid material being more likely to survive heavier loads.

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