Frameless spinal stereotaxis

Kevin Foley, Y. R. Rampersaud

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Frameless spinal stereotaxis, also termed 'image-guided spine surgery', is a recently developed technique that improves intraoperative spinal localization and navigation. This technology allows for precise mapping of surgical anatomy to preoperatively acquired computerized tomographic images in a real-time fashion. The ability to manipulate three-dimensional radiographic anatomy in clinically relevant planes and directly relate these images to surgically exposed structures provides the surgeon with an unprecedented ability to preoperatively plan surgical trajectories and localize spinal structures intraoperatively. Surgical tools can be tracked in relation to these anatomic displays, providing a view of 'hidden' structures beneath the exposed spinal surface and a 'look-ahead' view of proposed drill or screw trajectories. The resultant improvements in accuracy have been demonstrated experimentally and clinically. The technology has proven to be most useful in situations of unusual or complex anatomy. The investigative and clinical applications of frameless spinal stereotaxis continue to grow at a rapid pace. Future uses will extend to other structures, such as the pelvis and appendicular skeleton.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)104-110
Number of pages7
JournalCurrent Orthopaedics
Volume12
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1998

Fingerprint

Anatomy
Computer-Assisted Surgery
Technology
Mandrillus
Pelvis
Skeleton
Spine
Surgeons

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

Cite this

Frameless spinal stereotaxis. / Foley, Kevin; Rampersaud, Y. R.

In: Current Orthopaedics, Vol. 12, No. 2, 01.01.1998, p. 104-110.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Foley, Kevin ; Rampersaud, Y. R. / Frameless spinal stereotaxis. In: Current Orthopaedics. 1998 ; Vol. 12, No. 2. pp. 104-110.
@article{fb1cb19152aa42bd8c341ee2668acbcb,
title = "Frameless spinal stereotaxis",
abstract = "Frameless spinal stereotaxis, also termed 'image-guided spine surgery', is a recently developed technique that improves intraoperative spinal localization and navigation. This technology allows for precise mapping of surgical anatomy to preoperatively acquired computerized tomographic images in a real-time fashion. The ability to manipulate three-dimensional radiographic anatomy in clinically relevant planes and directly relate these images to surgically exposed structures provides the surgeon with an unprecedented ability to preoperatively plan surgical trajectories and localize spinal structures intraoperatively. Surgical tools can be tracked in relation to these anatomic displays, providing a view of 'hidden' structures beneath the exposed spinal surface and a 'look-ahead' view of proposed drill or screw trajectories. The resultant improvements in accuracy have been demonstrated experimentally and clinically. The technology has proven to be most useful in situations of unusual or complex anatomy. The investigative and clinical applications of frameless spinal stereotaxis continue to grow at a rapid pace. Future uses will extend to other structures, such as the pelvis and appendicular skeleton.",
author = "Kevin Foley and Rampersaud, {Y. R.}",
year = "1998",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/S0268-0890(98)90065-2",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "12",
pages = "104--110",
journal = "Orthopaedics and Trauma",
issn = "1877-1327",
publisher = "Churchill Livingstone",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Frameless spinal stereotaxis

AU - Foley, Kevin

AU - Rampersaud, Y. R.

PY - 1998/1/1

Y1 - 1998/1/1

N2 - Frameless spinal stereotaxis, also termed 'image-guided spine surgery', is a recently developed technique that improves intraoperative spinal localization and navigation. This technology allows for precise mapping of surgical anatomy to preoperatively acquired computerized tomographic images in a real-time fashion. The ability to manipulate three-dimensional radiographic anatomy in clinically relevant planes and directly relate these images to surgically exposed structures provides the surgeon with an unprecedented ability to preoperatively plan surgical trajectories and localize spinal structures intraoperatively. Surgical tools can be tracked in relation to these anatomic displays, providing a view of 'hidden' structures beneath the exposed spinal surface and a 'look-ahead' view of proposed drill or screw trajectories. The resultant improvements in accuracy have been demonstrated experimentally and clinically. The technology has proven to be most useful in situations of unusual or complex anatomy. The investigative and clinical applications of frameless spinal stereotaxis continue to grow at a rapid pace. Future uses will extend to other structures, such as the pelvis and appendicular skeleton.

AB - Frameless spinal stereotaxis, also termed 'image-guided spine surgery', is a recently developed technique that improves intraoperative spinal localization and navigation. This technology allows for precise mapping of surgical anatomy to preoperatively acquired computerized tomographic images in a real-time fashion. The ability to manipulate three-dimensional radiographic anatomy in clinically relevant planes and directly relate these images to surgically exposed structures provides the surgeon with an unprecedented ability to preoperatively plan surgical trajectories and localize spinal structures intraoperatively. Surgical tools can be tracked in relation to these anatomic displays, providing a view of 'hidden' structures beneath the exposed spinal surface and a 'look-ahead' view of proposed drill or screw trajectories. The resultant improvements in accuracy have been demonstrated experimentally and clinically. The technology has proven to be most useful in situations of unusual or complex anatomy. The investigative and clinical applications of frameless spinal stereotaxis continue to grow at a rapid pace. Future uses will extend to other structures, such as the pelvis and appendicular skeleton.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0031903748&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0031903748&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/S0268-0890(98)90065-2

DO - 10.1016/S0268-0890(98)90065-2

M3 - Article

VL - 12

SP - 104

EP - 110

JO - Orthopaedics and Trauma

JF - Orthopaedics and Trauma

SN - 1877-1327

IS - 2

ER -