From dispensing to disposal

The role of student pharmacists in medication disposal and the implementation of a take-back program

Misty D. Gray-Winnett, Courtney S. Davis, Stephanie G. Yokley, Andrea Franks

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: To decrease the amount of pharmaceuticals present in our community's water supply, reduce the accidental and intentional ingestion of pharmaceuticals, and increase awareness of proper medication disposal. Setting: Knoxville, TN, from November 2008 to November 2009. Practice description: Medication and thermometer collection events were held at various community retail establishments. Community officials and students collaborated to plan advertising, implementation, and appropriate medication and thermometer disposal. Event volunteers set up easily accessible tents and tables in hightraffic areas to collect unused medications, mercury thermometers, and recyclable medication bottles. Practice innovation: Student pharmacists worked cooperatively with community partners to collect unused medications and exchange thermometers. Main outcome measures: Pounds of recyclables collected, pounds of medications collected, and number of thermometers exchanged. Results: The events increased community awareness of appropriate medication disposal and pharmacists' roles in safe use of medications. From November 2008 to November 2009, more than 1,100 pounds of unwanted medications were collected through events and the drop box. Additionally, more than 470 pounds of recyclable packaging material was collected and 535 mercury thermometers exchanged. Conclusion: Student pharmacists can partner with community officials and businesses to provide safe and appropriate medication and mercury thermometer disposal.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)613-618
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of the American Pharmacists Association
Volume50
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2010

Fingerprint

Thermometers
Pharmacists
Students
Mercury
Packaging materials
Water Supply
Bottles
Product Packaging
Water supply
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Marketing
Volunteers
Eating
Innovation
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pharmacology (nursing)
  • Pharmacy
  • Pharmacology

Cite this

From dispensing to disposal : The role of student pharmacists in medication disposal and the implementation of a take-back program. / Gray-Winnett, Misty D.; Davis, Courtney S.; Yokley, Stephanie G.; Franks, Andrea.

In: Journal of the American Pharmacists Association, Vol. 50, No. 5, 01.01.2010, p. 613-618.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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