GA-67 citrate imaging in malignant lymphoma: Final report of cooperative group

G. A. Andrews, Karl Hubner, R. H. Greenlaw

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

In a large cooperative study of Ga-67 uptake in non-Hodgkin's malignant lymphoma, 76% of untreated patients showed positive uptake in one or more lesions. The percentage of known individual lesions seen on scan was significantly lower; thus, negative findings at any one site may have much less significance than positive findings. After treatment, the number of lesions seen decreases sharply, but the role of Ga-67 in evaluating response to therapy is uncertain, especially in view of the fairly large number of lesions undetectable before therapy. Histologic type plays a role in Ga-67 uptake. Large lesions are much more effectively detected than small ones. In spite of numerous false-negative results, Ga-67 scanning is a useful method in evaluating the extent of untreated disease and the presence of lesions posttherapy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1013-1019
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Nuclear Medicine
Volume19
Issue number9
StatePublished - Jan 1 1978
Externally publishedYes

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Citric Acid
Lymphoma
Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma
Therapeutics

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Radiological and Ultrasound Technology

Cite this

GA-67 citrate imaging in malignant lymphoma : Final report of cooperative group. / Andrews, G. A.; Hubner, Karl; Greenlaw, R. H.

In: Journal of Nuclear Medicine, Vol. 19, No. 9, 01.01.1978, p. 1013-1019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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