Gamma irradiation of HIV-1

Richard Smith, Jesse Ingels, John J. Lochemes, Joseph P. Dutkowsky, Linda Pifer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

54 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The potential for transmission of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) type 1 has created serious concern for the continued clinical use of bone and soft-tissue allografts. Tissue banks have employed 1.5-2.5 Mrad for sterilization of bone and tendon allografts, which, according to the current literature, approaches the level at which the tissue quality is adversely affected for implantation. Our working hypothesis was that gamma irradiation at increasing doses can proportionately inactivate HIV type 1. The objective of this study was to inactivate HIV type 1 by irradiation, as determined by its capacity to infect human T-lymphocytes and established cell lines in vitro. The replicative competence of HIV type 1 was also assessed by the presence of reverse transcriptase activity, enzyme-linked immunoadsorbent assay (ELISA), immunofluorescence assays for p24 viral core antigen, and the formation of syncytia induced by HIV type 1 in the cultures inoculated with irradiated virus. The results demonstrated the presence of active viral replication in previously noninfected cells in the supernatant samples that were exposed to as much as 5.0 Mrad. The data for the 10-Mrad sample were indeterminate due to cellular damage. These data suggest that gamma irradiation (1.5-2.5 Mrad) does not constitute a virucidal dose for HIV type 1. Current technologies for screening have greatly improved, and the surgeon should rely on tissue bank screening procedures and other methods of preparation rather than sterilization by gamma radiation techniques in choosing allograft material.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)815-819
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Orthopaedic Research
Volume19
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 11 2001

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HIV-1
Tissue Banks
Allografts
Bone and Bones
Immunosorbents
Viral Antigens
RNA-Directed DNA Polymerase
Gamma Rays
Giant Cells
Tendons
Mental Competency
Fluorescent Antibody Technique
Viruses
Technology
T-Lymphocytes
Cell Line
Enzymes

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

Cite this

Gamma irradiation of HIV-1. / Smith, Richard; Ingels, Jesse; Lochemes, John J.; Dutkowsky, Joseph P.; Pifer, Linda.

In: Journal of Orthopaedic Research, Vol. 19, No. 5, 11.09.2001, p. 815-819.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Smith, R, Ingels, J, Lochemes, JJ, Dutkowsky, JP & Pifer, L 2001, 'Gamma irradiation of HIV-1', Journal of Orthopaedic Research, vol. 19, no. 5, pp. 815-819. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0736-0266(01)00018-3
Smith, Richard ; Ingels, Jesse ; Lochemes, John J. ; Dutkowsky, Joseph P. ; Pifer, Linda. / Gamma irradiation of HIV-1. In: Journal of Orthopaedic Research. 2001 ; Vol. 19, No. 5. pp. 815-819.
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