Gastrointestinal myoelectric activity in a child with gastroschisis and ileal atresia

Guozhang Cheng, Max Langham, Charles A. Sninsky, James L. Talbert, Michael P. Hocking

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Gastroschisis is frequently associated with intestinal atresia and alterations in gastrointestinal function. The authors studied gastric and small bowel myoelectric activity in a child who had a complex course and prolonged inability to tolerate oral intake after staged repair of gastroschisis and an associated ileal atresia. The child remained unable to tolerate oral intake after repair of the atresia and was reexplored 3 months later to rule out a partial small bowel obstruction, with simultaneous placement of serosal electrodes on the stomach and proximal small bowel. Persistent gastric dysrhythmias were observed postoperatively, and the child was unable to tolerate gastrostomy tube feedings. Abnormalities were also seen in small bowel motility, including retrograde propagation of activity fronts of the migrating myoelectric complex. However, the intestine converted to a fed myoelectric pattern with tube feedings, and the child was subsequently able to tolerate feedings via a tube placed directly into the smell bowel. The authors conclude that myoelectric recordings vie implanted electrodes are safe and feasible in children, and may give information regarding underlying motility alterations. The ultimate clinical role of myoelectric recordings in treating children with suspected motility disorders will require further study.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)923-927
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Pediatric Surgery
Volume32
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1997
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Gastroschisis
Stomach
Enteral Nutrition
Intestinal Atresia
Migrating Myoelectric Complexes
Implanted Electrodes
Gastrostomy
Smell
Intestines
Electrodes

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Surgery
  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Gastrointestinal myoelectric activity in a child with gastroschisis and ileal atresia. / Cheng, Guozhang; Langham, Max; Sninsky, Charles A.; Talbert, James L.; Hocking, Michael P.

In: Journal of Pediatric Surgery, Vol. 32, No. 6, 01.01.1997, p. 923-927.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Cheng, Guozhang ; Langham, Max ; Sninsky, Charles A. ; Talbert, James L. ; Hocking, Michael P. / Gastrointestinal myoelectric activity in a child with gastroschisis and ileal atresia. In: Journal of Pediatric Surgery. 1997 ; Vol. 32, No. 6. pp. 923-927.
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