Gender differences in the social problem-solving performance of adolescents

Laura Murphy, Steven M. Ross

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Compared to other cognitive measures, social problem solving has received little attention in research on gender differences. In the present study, the Means-Ends Problem-Solving Procedure and the Personal Attributes Questionnaire (PAQ) were administered to 207 adolescents to examine social problem-solving skills as a function of subject gender, PAQ type, and gender of protagonist. Hypotheses were that superior problem solving would occur (a) for androgynous and masculine PAQ types and (b) when subject gender and/or PAQ type corresponded with protagonist gender. Results failed to corroborate these patterns, but indicated a clear overall advantage for females over males. A follow-up multiple-regression analysis showed this effect to be stable after controlling for English level. In a supplementary analysis, PAQ breakdowns were compared for the present sample and for one tested in a different region seven years earlier. Overall, the research findings imply that fewer adolescents today are likely to identify with traditional feminine roles, and that sex-related personality traits have, in general, a relatively limited impact on social problem-solving skills.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)251-264
Number of pages14
JournalSex Roles
Volume16
Issue number5-6
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 1987
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

social problem
Social Problems
gender-specific factors
adolescent
questionnaire
performance
gender
personality traits
regression analysis
Research
Personality
Regression Analysis
Surveys and Questionnaires
present

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Gender Studies
  • Social Psychology
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

Cite this

Gender differences in the social problem-solving performance of adolescents. / Murphy, Laura; Ross, Steven M.

In: Sex Roles, Vol. 16, No. 5-6, 01.03.1987, p. 251-264.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Murphy, Laura ; Ross, Steven M. / Gender differences in the social problem-solving performance of adolescents. In: Sex Roles. 1987 ; Vol. 16, No. 5-6. pp. 251-264.
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