Gene expression patterns in deceased donor kidneys developing delayed graft function after kidney transplantation

Valeria Mas, Kellie J. Archer, Kenneth Yanek, Catherine I. Dumur, Maria I. Capparuccini, Martin J. Mangino, Anne King, Eric M. Gibney, Robert Fisher, Marc Posner, Daniel Maluf

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

30 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background. Delayed graft function (DGF) after kidney transplantation (KTx) ranges between 2% and 50%. The mechanisms leading to DGF deserve special interest because DGF exerts negative influences on long-term outcomes. We studied gene expression profiles in deceased donor kidney (DDK) biopsies with and without DGF. Methods. Gene expression profiling was performed on donor kidney tissues from 33 DDK with the use of microarrays. DDK were classified as grafts with immediate function (non-DGF; n=21) and grafts with DGF (n=12). DGF was defined as a dialysis requirement in the first week after transplantation. Demographic donor and recipient information was collected. The robust-multiarray average method was used to estimate probe set expression summaries. Logistic regression was used to identify genes significantly associated with DGF development. Results. Patients were followed for 3 months after KTx. Thirty-eight probe sets (n=36 genes) were univariably differentially expressed in DDK with DGF when compared with DDK with non-DGF (α=0.001). Sixty-nine probe sets (n=65 genes) were differentially expressed inDDKwithDGFwhen compared withDDKwith non-DGF after adjusting for cold ischemia time (α=0.001). Gene ontology terms classified the overexpressed genes in DDK with DGF as principally related to cell cycle/growth (e.g., IGFBP5, CSNK2A2), signal transduction (e.g., RASGRP3), immune response (e.g., CD83, BCL3, MX1), and metabolism (e.g., ENPP4, GBA3). TNFRSF1B was overexpressed in DDK with DGF. Conclusions. Cold ischemia time was a predictor ofDGFindependently of the preservation method.Weidentified a set of 36 genes candidates of DGF in DDK, with genes involved in the inflammatory response being the more important.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)626-635
Number of pages10
JournalTransplantation
Volume85
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2008
Externally publishedYes

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Delayed Graft Function
Kidney Transplantation
Tissue Donors
Kidney
Gene Expression
Genes
Transplants
Cold Ischemia
Gene Ontology
Gene Expression Profiling
Transcriptome
Dialysis
Signal Transduction
Cell Cycle

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Transplantation

Cite this

Gene expression patterns in deceased donor kidneys developing delayed graft function after kidney transplantation. / Mas, Valeria; Archer, Kellie J.; Yanek, Kenneth; Dumur, Catherine I.; Capparuccini, Maria I.; Mangino, Martin J.; King, Anne; Gibney, Eric M.; Fisher, Robert; Posner, Marc; Maluf, Daniel.

In: Transplantation, Vol. 85, No. 4, 01.12.2008, p. 626-635.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Mas, V, Archer, KJ, Yanek, K, Dumur, CI, Capparuccini, MI, Mangino, MJ, King, A, Gibney, EM, Fisher, R, Posner, M & Maluf, D 2008, 'Gene expression patterns in deceased donor kidneys developing delayed graft function after kidney transplantation', Transplantation, vol. 85, no. 4, pp. 626-635. https://doi.org/10.1097/TP.0b013e318165491f
Mas, Valeria ; Archer, Kellie J. ; Yanek, Kenneth ; Dumur, Catherine I. ; Capparuccini, Maria I. ; Mangino, Martin J. ; King, Anne ; Gibney, Eric M. ; Fisher, Robert ; Posner, Marc ; Maluf, Daniel. / Gene expression patterns in deceased donor kidneys developing delayed graft function after kidney transplantation. In: Transplantation. 2008 ; Vol. 85, No. 4. pp. 626-635.
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abstract = "Background. Delayed graft function (DGF) after kidney transplantation (KTx) ranges between 2{\%} and 50{\%}. The mechanisms leading to DGF deserve special interest because DGF exerts negative influences on long-term outcomes. We studied gene expression profiles in deceased donor kidney (DDK) biopsies with and without DGF. Methods. Gene expression profiling was performed on donor kidney tissues from 33 DDK with the use of microarrays. DDK were classified as grafts with immediate function (non-DGF; n=21) and grafts with DGF (n=12). DGF was defined as a dialysis requirement in the first week after transplantation. Demographic donor and recipient information was collected. The robust-multiarray average method was used to estimate probe set expression summaries. Logistic regression was used to identify genes significantly associated with DGF development. Results. Patients were followed for 3 months after KTx. Thirty-eight probe sets (n=36 genes) were univariably differentially expressed in DDK with DGF when compared with DDK with non-DGF (α=0.001). Sixty-nine probe sets (n=65 genes) were differentially expressed inDDKwithDGFwhen compared withDDKwith non-DGF after adjusting for cold ischemia time (α=0.001). Gene ontology terms classified the overexpressed genes in DDK with DGF as principally related to cell cycle/growth (e.g., IGFBP5, CSNK2A2), signal transduction (e.g., RASGRP3), immune response (e.g., CD83, BCL3, MX1), and metabolism (e.g., ENPP4, GBA3). TNFRSF1B was overexpressed in DDK with DGF. Conclusions. Cold ischemia time was a predictor ofDGFindependently of the preservation method.Weidentified a set of 36 genes candidates of DGF in DDK, with genes involved in the inflammatory response being the more important.",
author = "Valeria Mas and Archer, {Kellie J.} and Kenneth Yanek and Dumur, {Catherine I.} and Capparuccini, {Maria I.} and Mangino, {Martin J.} and Anne King and Gibney, {Eric M.} and Robert Fisher and Marc Posner and Daniel Maluf",
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T1 - Gene expression patterns in deceased donor kidneys developing delayed graft function after kidney transplantation

AU - Mas, Valeria

AU - Archer, Kellie J.

AU - Yanek, Kenneth

AU - Dumur, Catherine I.

AU - Capparuccini, Maria I.

AU - Mangino, Martin J.

AU - King, Anne

AU - Gibney, Eric M.

AU - Fisher, Robert

AU - Posner, Marc

AU - Maluf, Daniel

PY - 2008/12/1

Y1 - 2008/12/1

N2 - Background. Delayed graft function (DGF) after kidney transplantation (KTx) ranges between 2% and 50%. The mechanisms leading to DGF deserve special interest because DGF exerts negative influences on long-term outcomes. We studied gene expression profiles in deceased donor kidney (DDK) biopsies with and without DGF. Methods. Gene expression profiling was performed on donor kidney tissues from 33 DDK with the use of microarrays. DDK were classified as grafts with immediate function (non-DGF; n=21) and grafts with DGF (n=12). DGF was defined as a dialysis requirement in the first week after transplantation. Demographic donor and recipient information was collected. The robust-multiarray average method was used to estimate probe set expression summaries. Logistic regression was used to identify genes significantly associated with DGF development. Results. Patients were followed for 3 months after KTx. Thirty-eight probe sets (n=36 genes) were univariably differentially expressed in DDK with DGF when compared with DDK with non-DGF (α=0.001). Sixty-nine probe sets (n=65 genes) were differentially expressed inDDKwithDGFwhen compared withDDKwith non-DGF after adjusting for cold ischemia time (α=0.001). Gene ontology terms classified the overexpressed genes in DDK with DGF as principally related to cell cycle/growth (e.g., IGFBP5, CSNK2A2), signal transduction (e.g., RASGRP3), immune response (e.g., CD83, BCL3, MX1), and metabolism (e.g., ENPP4, GBA3). TNFRSF1B was overexpressed in DDK with DGF. Conclusions. Cold ischemia time was a predictor ofDGFindependently of the preservation method.Weidentified a set of 36 genes candidates of DGF in DDK, with genes involved in the inflammatory response being the more important.

AB - Background. Delayed graft function (DGF) after kidney transplantation (KTx) ranges between 2% and 50%. The mechanisms leading to DGF deserve special interest because DGF exerts negative influences on long-term outcomes. We studied gene expression profiles in deceased donor kidney (DDK) biopsies with and without DGF. Methods. Gene expression profiling was performed on donor kidney tissues from 33 DDK with the use of microarrays. DDK were classified as grafts with immediate function (non-DGF; n=21) and grafts with DGF (n=12). DGF was defined as a dialysis requirement in the first week after transplantation. Demographic donor and recipient information was collected. The robust-multiarray average method was used to estimate probe set expression summaries. Logistic regression was used to identify genes significantly associated with DGF development. Results. Patients were followed for 3 months after KTx. Thirty-eight probe sets (n=36 genes) were univariably differentially expressed in DDK with DGF when compared with DDK with non-DGF (α=0.001). Sixty-nine probe sets (n=65 genes) were differentially expressed inDDKwithDGFwhen compared withDDKwith non-DGF after adjusting for cold ischemia time (α=0.001). Gene ontology terms classified the overexpressed genes in DDK with DGF as principally related to cell cycle/growth (e.g., IGFBP5, CSNK2A2), signal transduction (e.g., RASGRP3), immune response (e.g., CD83, BCL3, MX1), and metabolism (e.g., ENPP4, GBA3). TNFRSF1B was overexpressed in DDK with DGF. Conclusions. Cold ischemia time was a predictor ofDGFindependently of the preservation method.Weidentified a set of 36 genes candidates of DGF in DDK, with genes involved in the inflammatory response being the more important.

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