Genes associated with progression and recurrence of hepatocellular carcinoma in hepatitis C patients waiting and undergoing liver transplantation

Preliminary results

Valeria Mas, Robert A. Fisher, Kellie J. Archer, Kenneth C. Yanek, Bridgette Williams, Catherine I. Dumur, Daniel Maluf

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

26 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

BACKGROUND. Liver transplantation (LT) represents a curative treatment for small hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Potentially curable higher-stage HCC patients are denied LT due to the lack of cancer markers that predict progression and recurrence. METHODS. Thirty-eight candidates for LT with hepatitis C virus (HCV) cirrhosis and HCC were studied. Gene expression (Gexp) analysis of tumor samples was performed using microarrays. RESULTS. Twenty patients underwent transplantation, 13 progressed while waiting for transplantation, 4 are alive awaiting transplantation, and 1 died without progression while waiting for LT. Differences in GExp among patients who underwent LT or did not progress (n=25) versus those whose disease progressed while waiting for LT (n=13) were assessed. Thus, 54 probe sets (Pset) were significantly differentially expressed. Among LT patients, 10 Psets were differentially expressed between LT patients with the same explanted stage that recurred (n=5) versus LT patients who did not recur (n=5). Ninety-eight Psets were significantly associated with survival at the α=0.005 level. CONCLUSIONS. Here, we have identified genes associated with HCC progression in HCV-HCC patients awaiting LT transplantation. A limited number of genes were related to overall survival and cancer-free survival after LT. Incorporation of these molecular markers could help to improve organ allocation for HCV-HCC patients.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)973-981
Number of pages9
JournalTransplantation
Volume83
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2007

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Hepatitis C
Liver Transplantation
Hepatocellular Carcinoma
Recurrence
Genes
Transplantation
Hepacivirus
Survival
Neoplasms
Fibrosis
Gene Expression

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Transplantation

Cite this

Genes associated with progression and recurrence of hepatocellular carcinoma in hepatitis C patients waiting and undergoing liver transplantation : Preliminary results. / Mas, Valeria; Fisher, Robert A.; Archer, Kellie J.; Yanek, Kenneth C.; Williams, Bridgette; Dumur, Catherine I.; Maluf, Daniel.

In: Transplantation, Vol. 83, No. 7, 01.04.2007, p. 973-981.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Mas, Valeria ; Fisher, Robert A. ; Archer, Kellie J. ; Yanek, Kenneth C. ; Williams, Bridgette ; Dumur, Catherine I. ; Maluf, Daniel. / Genes associated with progression and recurrence of hepatocellular carcinoma in hepatitis C patients waiting and undergoing liver transplantation : Preliminary results. In: Transplantation. 2007 ; Vol. 83, No. 7. pp. 973-981.
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AB - BACKGROUND. Liver transplantation (LT) represents a curative treatment for small hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Potentially curable higher-stage HCC patients are denied LT due to the lack of cancer markers that predict progression and recurrence. METHODS. Thirty-eight candidates for LT with hepatitis C virus (HCV) cirrhosis and HCC were studied. Gene expression (Gexp) analysis of tumor samples was performed using microarrays. RESULTS. Twenty patients underwent transplantation, 13 progressed while waiting for transplantation, 4 are alive awaiting transplantation, and 1 died without progression while waiting for LT. Differences in GExp among patients who underwent LT or did not progress (n=25) versus those whose disease progressed while waiting for LT (n=13) were assessed. Thus, 54 probe sets (Pset) were significantly differentially expressed. Among LT patients, 10 Psets were differentially expressed between LT patients with the same explanted stage that recurred (n=5) versus LT patients who did not recur (n=5). Ninety-eight Psets were significantly associated with survival at the α=0.005 level. CONCLUSIONS. Here, we have identified genes associated with HCC progression in HCV-HCC patients awaiting LT transplantation. A limited number of genes were related to overall survival and cancer-free survival after LT. Incorporation of these molecular markers could help to improve organ allocation for HCV-HCC patients.

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